Medical Illustration

Post-graduate and certificate programs allow medical illustration graduates or people interested in medical communication from other fields to explore biomedical visualization or to add specializations to their repertoire of skills.

Please visit each program's website to carefully assess what the programs offer, their application requirements, and expected outcomes.


University of Georgia College Veterinary Medicine - USA

Post-Master's Certificate, Comparative Medical Illustration (1 year)
Web:http://www.vmerc.uga.edu/web/alumni.html
Note: Open to students enrolled in a CAAHEP-accredited medical illustration training program. For more info contact James Moore at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Glasgow School of Art/Simulation & Visualisation - Scotland

Post-MSc Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy (1 year)
Web:http://www.gsa.ac.uk/study/graduate-degrees/medical-visualisation-human-anatomy/

 

Glasgow School of Art/Simulation & Visualisation - Scotland

Post-MSc Serious Games & Virtual Reality (1 Year)
Web:http://www.gsa.ac.uk/study/graduate-degrees/serious-games-and-virtual-reality/

 


Medical Artists' Education Trust - UK

Post-Master's Certificate, Medical Art (1 year; self-directed online)
Web:http://www.maet.org.uk/

 

Biomedical Visualization and Communication

University of British Columbia Certificate Program, postgraduate (1 year)
Web: https://extendedlearning.ubc.ca/programs/biomedical-visualization-communication-certificate

Some undergraduate institutions offer minors or majors in “pre-medical”, “biological” or “scientific” illustration that may help students develop introductory skills and knowledge and potentially to prepare for medical illustration graduate programs. Please note: these programs are not required for, nor do they guarantee admission to, graduate programs. Undergraduate majors and minors are not subject to detailed standards and outcome measures related to medical illustration.

Science preparation is equally important as drawing ability for a successful career in medical illustration. If considering an art school for an undergraduate degree, be sure the biological science courses are of pre-med caliber. Please note: this list does not constitute an endorsement of specific undergraduate institutions by the AMI. The AMI only partners with CAAHEP to accredit graduate programs in medical illustration. If students are interested in graduate study, they should contact graduate programs of interest for recommendations regarding undergraduate institutions and programs.

Programs may contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to be added to the list.

Bachelor's Degree Majors in Pre-Medical, Biological or Scientific Illustration

Arcadia University

BA Scientific Illustration

Buena Vista University

BA Scientific Illustration / Pre-Medical Illustration

Cleveland Institute of Art

BFA Life Sciences Illustration

Ferris State University / Kendall College of Art & Design

BFA  Pre-Medical Illustration

Iowa State University

BA Biological and Pre-Medical Illustration

Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts

BA Illustration Nonfiction

Northern Illinois University

BFA Illustration, concentration in Scientific Illustration

Oglethorpe University

BA Studio Art — Medical and Scientific Illustration Track

Rochester Institute of Technology

BFA Medical Illustration

Rowan University / Dept Radio, TV & Film

BFA Biomedical Art and Visualization

University of Florida, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

BA or BS - Biological Illustration

University of Georgia / Lamar Dodd School of Art

BFA Studio Art with a Scientific Illustration

University of Zurich

BA Design, Scientific Visualization

Virginia Commonwealth University

BFA Communication Arts, concentration in Scientific Illustration

Bachelor's Degree Minors

Louisiana Tech University / VISTA (Visual Integration of Science Through Art) Center

BS or BA, Pre-medical Illustration

Olivet College

BA Biological Illustration concentration

Savannah College of Art and Design

BA Scientific Illustration minor

University of Illinois at Chicago

BS Life Science Visualization minor

University of Southern California, School Cinematic Arts

BA Science Visualization minor

University of Toronto Mississauga

BS Biomedical Communications minor (biology department)

Virginia Commonwealth University

BS Scientific Illustration minor (for biology majors - pre-medical)

Post-Baccalaureate Certificates

California State University Monterey Bay

Graduate Certificate in Science Illustration (1 year)

California State University Long Beach

Biomedical Illustration Prep Certificate (30 units taken during 4-year BA or BS degree)

Minnesota State University / Moorhead

Certificate Scientific Illustration

Rhode Island School of Design / Continuing Education

Certificate Natural Science Illustration (3 year)

University of Washington / Continuing Education

Certificate Natural Science Illustration (8 months)

University of British Columbia / Extended Learning

Certificate in Biomedical Visualization and Communication (1 year online)

 

 

 

 

 

Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces exhibited in the most recent annual AMI Salon. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! The full list of the salon award winners is below.

All AMI members may exhibit work as Professional members or as Student members. The entries are divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, and advertising, etc. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here.  Please enjoy these online galleries

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.


PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

Member's Choice Award
 N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020
Didactic/Instructional: Non-Commercial
 Nicholas Reback  Anatomic Features Contributing to Obstructive Sleep Apnea  Award of Merit
 Andy Rekito  Immunopathogenesis of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)  Award of Excellence
 Tianxing Shi  P-Lipo, a novel platelet-mimetic strategy in treating atherosclerosis  Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional: Commercial
 Cassio Lynm  A Novel Approach to Ablation Therapy  Award of Merit
Editorial
 Alissa Eckert  2020 Global Public Health Enemy #1: SARS-CoV-2  Award of Merit
 Wayne Heim  Controlling the speed and trajectory of evolution with counterdiabatic driving  Award of Merit
 Chris Bickel  Coronavirus Interrupted  Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
 Audra Geras  A Comparison of: Standard Mesh HVAC Filtration versus Heated Nickel Mesh HVAC Filtration  Award of Merit
Medical-Legal
 MediVisuals, Inc.  Burn Injuries and Treatments  Award of Excellence
 Artery Studios, Inc.  Concepts of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) – Nathan and Marcus Smith  Award of Merit
 Jennifer C. Darcy  Janie Doe: 7/25/15 Right Leg Injuries Following Gunshot Wound  Award of Excellence
 Jennifer C. Darcy  John Doe’s Traumatic Facial Injuries  Award of Merit
 MediVisuals, Inc.  Mechanism of Scalping Injury  Award of Merit
Illustrated Text (Traditionally Printed Book)
 N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020
Animation: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial 
 INVIVO Communications Inc  COVID-19 and the Science of Soap  Award of Excellence
 Nucleus Medical Media  Decoding Cancer Immunology: Hunting Hidden Tumours  Award of Merit
 Tziporah Thompson  Educational Anatomy GIFs for Social Media  Award of Merit
 Nucleus Medical Media  How COVID-19 Affects the Body  Award of Merit
 AXS Studio  Vaccines vs Antivirals: What's the difference?  Award of Merit
Animation: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
 INVIVO Communications Inc  HSDD & Treatment with Bremelanotide  Award of Merit
 INVIVO Communications Inc  Pathophysiology of ATTR-CM  Award of Merit
 AXS Studio  The Role of Contractility in Cardiac Function  Award of Excellence
Animation: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
 N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020
Animation: Medical-Legal
 N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial 
 Sam Bond  Cardiac Rehab Explorer  Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
 N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020
Simulators, Prosthetics and Sculptural Products
 N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020  N/A in 2020

 


STUDENT CATEGORIES

Student Best of Show
 Hang Lin  Cyborg Botany  Best of Show
 Alexander Young  Twin-Twin Training Simulator: an interactive 3D surgical tool for teaching fetoscopic laster ablation to treat TTTS  Best of Show
Didactic/Instructional – Anatomical/Pathological  
 Hang Lin  Acquired Ocular Toxoplasmosis  Award of Excellence
 Victoria Zakrewski  Dissection of Pharyngeal Arch 1 Derivatives  Award of Merit
 Emily Cheng  The Accessory Nerve CNXI Pathway  Award of Merit
 Sora Ji  The relationship of the corpus callosum to structures of the hippocampus.  Award of Excellence
Didactic/Instructional – Surgical/Clinical Procedures
 Katharine Thompson  ACL Reconstruction: Arthroscopic Graft Placement  Award of Merit
 Siwen Wang  Foley Catheterization  Award of Merit
 Jenny Wang  Robotic Donor Nephrectomy - Steps 8 and 9  Award of Excellence
 Morgan Summerlin  Robotic-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Control of the Prostatic Pedicle  Award of Excellence
 Madison Christian  Swine Ovariohysterectomy  Award of Merit
 Megan Ward  Total Thyroidectomy  Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Molecular/Biological/Life Sciences  
 Colleen Paris  A Guide to Potentially Habitable Exoplanets  Award of Excellence
 Evelyn Lockhart  An Illusion of Fire and Ice  Award of Merit
 Brittany Cheung  Emperor Penguins: Breeding Season and Adaptations  Award of Excellence
 Emily Cheng  Life Cycle of the Flower Hat Jelly  Award of Excellence
 Ava Schroedl  Mapping the Binding Sites of the Opioid Antidote  Award of Merit
 Margot Riggi  Pyocins: natural bacteria killers  Award of Merit
 Zhen Bai  The Perfect Match of Demise  Award of Merit
Editorial  
 Emily Taylor  Clinical Trials of Cancer Drugs Fail Due to Missed Target Protein  Award of Merit
 Hang Lin  Cyborg Botany  Award of Excellence
 Eric Chung  Predicting Peking Man: An Anthropological Approximation  Award of Merit
 Christine (Si Ting) Shan  Space Biomining  Award of Merit
Still Media – Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
 Kristin Piciacchia  Meet CPAP: A Guide to Getting Your Best Rest  Award of Merit
Animation
 Ushma Patel  Bacteriophage Therapy and Antibiotic Resistance  Award of Merit
 Avesta Rastan  Illuminating Medulloblastoma  Award of Merit
 Tracy Xiang  Preoperative Anemia Patient Education: A Character Driven Story  Award of Merit
 Morgan Summerlin  Visualizing HOPE: Encouraging HIV-Positive Organ Transplantation  Award of Merit
Interactive  
 Alexander Young  Twin-Twin Training Simulator: an interactive 3D surgical tool for teaching fetoscopic laster ablation to treat TTTS  Award of Excellence

 

 

 

Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces exhibited in the most recent annual AMI Salon. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! The full list of the salon award winners is below.

All AMI members may exhibit work as Professional members or as Student members. The entries are divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, and advertising, etc. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here.  Please enjoy these online galleries.

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 

PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

Member's Choice Award
Cynthia Turner Flora Ralph Sweet Award
Amy Zhong Blepharoplasty Teacher Ralph Sweet Award
XVIVO Scientific Animation Dental Biofilm, Dysbiosis & Disease New Media
Didactic/Instructional: Non-Commercial
Ryan Kissinger The Physiology of a Mosquito Bite Award of Merit
Natalie Koscal Autologous Complete Tracheal Replacement in a 12-Year-Old Girl Award of Merit
Amy Zhong Blepharoplasty Teacher Award of Excellence
Didactic/Instructional: Commercial
Amy D'Camp Duodenal Ulcers and Surrounding Anatomy Award of Merit
Kari Opert External ventricular drainage device Award of Merit
AXS Studio Inc. Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) Poster Brochure Award of Merit
Editorial
Satyen Tripathi Real. Genuine. Heart. Award of Merit
Peter Lawrence Controversies in Skull Base Surgery Award of Excellence
Ian Suk Pulsatile Glymphatic Transport Award of Excellence
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
Wayne Heim Spine Augmentation for Treatment of Scoliosis Award of Merit
1-mu studio Metaphoric Overview of Venous Disease and Therapeutic Strategies Award of Excellence
Cynthia Turner Flora Award of Excellence
Medical-Legal
Jennifer Darcy John Doe’s Left Hand Amputation and Crush Injuries Award of Excellence
Jennifer Darcy Mechanism of Injury and Resulting Right Leg Crush Injuries Award of Merit
Artery Studios Inc. Robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy surgery – John Doe Award of Merit
Philip Mattes Chemical Neurolysis Versus Radiofrequency Ablation of the Intercostal Nerve Award of Merit
Illustrated Text (Traditionally Printed Book)
Levent Efe Facial Volumization - An anatomic approach Award of Merit
Yana Hammond A Patient's Guide to Bladder Cancer Award of Excellence
Heidi Richter Hockey Anatomy Award of Excellence
Animation: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial 
Lydia Gregg Lyme Disease: Infection, Immune System Evasion & Progression Award of Excellence
Paul Kelly Whipple procedure with multivisceral resections and vascular reconstruction Award of Merit
Tziporah Thompson About Your Transsphenoidal Surgery Award of Merit
Animation: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
Nucleus Medical Media Enabling Delivery of Life Changing Medicines Award of Merit
INVIVO Communications Wet AMD: Mechanism of Disease Animation Award of Merit
INVIVO Communications Immunotherapy Patient Animation Award of Merit
INVIVO Communications Brentuximab Vedotin-Nivolumab (BV-Nivo) MOA Animation Award of Merit
Animation: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
INVIVO Communications The Science of Giving Award of Excellence
Animation: Medical-Legal
MediVisuals, Inc. Cervical Spine Injures, Gardner Wells Tongs Placement, Cervical Decompression and Fusion Award of Excellence
High Impact Mechanism of Injury: C5 Tetraplegia after Shallow Dive Award of Excellence
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial 
MediVisuals, Inc. Traumatic Brain Injury Digital Interactive Interface Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
XVIVO Scientific Animation Dental Biofilm, Dysbiosis & Disease Award of Merit
Simulators, Prosthetics and Sculptural Products
Alissa Eckert 3d Printed Gastroschisis Infant Award of Merit
Marcelo Oliver Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Model Award of Merit
Elizabeth Weissbrod Medical Moulage Temporary Tattoos Award of Excellence

   

 

STUDENT CATEGORIES

 
Student Best of Show
Lisa Qiu Novel HIV Vaccine Research and Development New Media Best of Show
Felix Donghwi Son Chronic Rheumatic Heart Disease New Media Best of Show
Didactic/Instructional – Anatomical/Pathological  
Zachary Kevorkian The Pediatric Inguinal Canal/Descent of the Testes and Cryptorchidism Award of Merit
Felix Donghwi Son Chronic Rheumatic Heart Disease Award of Excellence
Morgan Summerlin Pathway of the Greater Petrosal Nerve Award of Excellence
Colleen Tang Poy Unboxing the Bitterness: A Graphic Memoir Award of Merit
Jenny Wang Fornix and Related Structures Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Surgical/Clinical Procedures
Weston DeWolff Radical Nephrectomy, Subcostal Approach Award of Excellence
Katharine Thompson Baerveldt Aqueous Shunt Insertion Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Molecular/Biological/Life Sciences  
Amy Cao Biomimicry: Mimicking the Masters Award of Excellence
Aaron Cole Combating Insulin Deficiency in Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Award of Excellence
Camille Kowalski White Nose Syndrome Award of Merit
Avesta Rastan The Cancer Paradox Award of Merit
Jamie Peterson Life Cycle of the Shield Shrimp Award of Merit
Editorial  
William Guzman, Jr. Nutty Noggin Award of Excellence
Shirley Long Using Light to Probe the Microscopic Award of Merit
Jamie Peterson Scent of Life Award of Merit
Felix Donghwi Son Virocop Award of Excellence
Alexander Young Lab Grown, Farm Fresh: Inside the Quest to bring lab-to-table and create slaughter-free meat Award of Excellence
Animation
Dani Bergey Transcription in Myc-Related Cancers Award of Excellence
Dani Bergey HiVolt: A Rapid HIV Viral Load Test Award of Merit
Alisa Brandt Morphology of Memory: The Anatomy of the Human Hippocampus Award of Merit
Cecilia Johnson In Vitro Fertilization – What Happens in the Lab? Award of Merit
Lucas Lin Deciphering Fossils with Ecomorphology Award of Excellence
Lisa Qiu Novel HIV Vaccine Research and Development Award of Excellence
Alexia Schill '3D Printing a Chemo Sponge' Award of Merit
Interactive  
Natividad Chen Kinundrum: a problem-based multimedia learning application for undergraduate kinesiology education Award of Excellence
Aimee Choi 3D Interactive Surgical Module on Orthognathic Osteotomies Award of Merit
Yue Liu An Interactive Website on Interpreting Adenovirus Transcription Map Award of Merit

 

 

 

Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces exhibited in the most recent annual AMI Salon. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! The full list of the salon award winners is below.

All AMI members may exhibit work as Professional members or as Student members. The entries are divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, and advertising, etc. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here.  Please enjoy these online galleries.

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 

PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

Member's Choice Award
Natalie Koscal Cardiac Anatomy of 22-Month-Old Conjoined Twins with Complex Congenital Heart Disease Ralph Sweet Award
Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro, Amanda Behr, and Michael Jensen Xytex Presents: Specimen Collection and Processing New Media
Didactic/Instructional: Non-Commercial
Alison Burke Bioinspired Slug-Slime Adhesive Patch Award of Merit
Natalie Koscal Cardiac Anatomy of 22-Month-Old Conjoined Twins with Complex Congenital Heart Disease Award of Merit
Peter Lawrence Lateral Approaches to the Lumbar Spine: Relevant Surgical Anatomy Award of Merit
Editorial
Lydia Gregg Gross and Histological Appearance of Endometriotic Lesions Award of Excellence
AXS Studio Inc. Life Support for Livers Award of Excellence
Todd Buck Stimulant and Designer Drug Use Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
Radius Digital Science Novartis Pipeline Compounds: Style Guide and Illustrations Award of Excellence
Thomas Nowacki Aortic Valve No Exchange Catheter (AVNEC) Award of Merit
Medical-Legal
Philip Mattes and Paul Gross Right Knee Injuries Award of Excellence
Hardy Fowler Dog Bite Injuries Award of Merit
Artery Studios Inc. Injury to left foot – John Smith Award of Merit
Illustrated Text (Traditionally Printed Book)
Jennifer Fairman and Corinne Sandone Atlas of Minimally Invasive Surgical Operations Award of Excellence
Michael King Mayo Clinic Principles of Shoulder Surgery Award of Merit
Cassio Lynm Lymphedema: Complete Medical and Surgical Management Award of Merit
Mark Miller Lateral Skull Base Surgery. The House Clinic Atlas Award of Merit
Animation: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial 
Jeff Day Antibiotics vs. Bacteria: Fighting the Resistance Award of Excellence
Paul Kelly Hepatic Artery Aneurysm – Resection and Hepatic Artery Reconstruction Award of Excellence
AXS Studio Inc. Animations created for The Gene Doctors Award of Excellence
Jeff Day Cholesterol Good and Bad Award of Merit
INVIVO Communications Inc. The Science of Malaria Award of Merit
Animation: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro, Amanda Behr, and Michael Jensen Xytex Presents: Specimen Collection and Processing Award of Excellence
Nucleus Medical Media Anabasum: Mechanism of Action Award of Merit
Animation: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
Radius Digital Science YONDELIS®: A Guide to Your 24-Hour Outpatient Infusion Experience Award of Excellence
Scientific Animations Ellex- ABiC with iTrack Award of Excellence
Radius Digital Science Understanding ADPKD Award of Merit
Animation: Medical-Legal
High Impact, Inc. Cinematic Summary of Injuries: Gunshot Award of Excellence
MediVisuals, Inc. Administration of Calcium Phosphate (CaP) Bone Cement into Blood Stream Award of Excellence
High Impact, Inc. Gamma Knife: Radiated Optic Tract & Hypothalamus Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial 
HHMI BioInteractive & AXS Studio CRISPR-Cas9: Mechanism & Applications Award of Excellence
Alexis Ennis E-Guide for Physical Diagnosis - the Pelvic and Breast Exam Award of Excellence
High Impact, Inc. Digital Injury Summary of Jane Doe Award of Excellence
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
High Impact, Inc. Simulated Vision Impairment Award of Excellence
Interactive Media: Gaming
AXS Studio Inc. Guardians of the Genome Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Interactive Textbook
Ron Boisvert Introduction to Human Anatomy iBook Award of Merit
Michael Konomos Basic Science Breakthroughs: Fragile X Syndrome Award of Merit
Simulators, Prosthetics and Sculptural Products
Sarah Samaroo Progression of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Over Time Award of Excellence
Wes Price Equine Phalanges: A Comparison of 3D Capture Methods Award of Merit

   

 

STUDENT CATEGORIES

 
Student Best of Show
Lisa Qiu Tomorrow's Perfect Humans Orville Parkes Best of Show
Amanda Slade Resurrecting an Ancient Bite: Virtual Chewing Model Sheds Light on one of the Earliest Primates New Media Best of Show
Didactic/Instructional – Anatomical/Pathological  
Aileen Lin False Alarm: Having a Panic Attack Award of Excellence
Chelsea Canlas Pathology of Oral Herpes Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Surgical/Clinical Procedures
Elizabeth DePace Pig Ovariohysterectomy Award of Excellence
Didactic/Instructional – Molecular/Biological/Life Sciences  
Cecilia Johnson Alatinidae Box Jellyfish: Known Life Stages and Anatomy Award of Merit
Felix Donghwi Son ATR-inhibitor: A Novel Approach to Targeting the Achilles' Heel of Cancer Award of Merit
Felix Donghwi Son Quantification of Cellular Organelle Size Award of Merit
Editorial  
Cecilia Johnson Piecing Together Ancient Migration Award of Excellence
Andrea Lam Ladybugs & Satellite Design: Folding for Outer Space Award of Excellence
Lisa Qiu Tomorrow's Perfect Humans Award of Excellence
Lucas Lin Automated Robotic Surgery Award of Merit
Amanda Miller Pigeons as Pathologists? Award of Merit
Natalie Yoshioka Beyond Consent Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
Shawna Snyder Ahmed Glaucoma Valve: Concept for Trade Show Booth Display Award of Excellence
Danielle VanBrabant Myocardial Infarction: The Role of Anti-Platelet Aggregation Treatment Award of Merit
Animation
Alisa Brandt How a Bruise Forms Award of Excellence
Natividad Chen Medical Genomics: from Research to Patient Care Award of Excellence
Stephanie O’Neil The HDL Gold Nanoparticle and a Potential Therapy in B cell Lymphoma Award of Excellence
Lauren Huff Adoptive Cell Transfer: A New Type of Cancer Immunotherapy Award of Merit
Jung Hee Lee Visual Communication Strategies for Study Participant Recruitment: “What is Drugs in Lactation Analysis Consortium (DLAC)?” Award of Merit
Interactive  
Amanda Slade Resurrecting an Ancient Bite: Virtual Chewing Model Sheds Light on one of the Earliest Primates Award of Excellence
Liza Knipscher Opsonization Award of Merit
 

Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces exhibited in the most recent annual AMI Salon. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! The full list of the salon award winners is below.

All AMI members may exhibit work as Professional members or as Student members. The entries are divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, and advertising, etc. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here.  Please enjoy these online galleries.

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 

PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

Member's Choice Award
David Cheney Arm Orthosis Ralph Sweet Award
Amanda Behr and Michael Jensen Infertility Treatments New Media
Didactic/Instructional: Non-Commercial
David Cheney Rat Facial Nerve Surgery Award of Merit
Scott Weldon Minimally-invasive Modified Nicks Procedure for the Repair of a Small Aortic Root Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional: Commercial  
Amy D'Camp Prokaryotic vs. Eukaryotic Cells Award of Merit
Editorial  
Peter Lawrence Surgery of the Brainstem Award of Excellence
Edmond Alexander Membrane Destruction Award of Merit
Valerie Altounian Synthetic Chromosomes Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
Nick Klein and Andrew Swift Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Lung Disease Award of Excellence
David Cheney Arm Orthosis Award of Merit
Nathaniel Klein Detecting Protein Interactions with High Affinity Bioluminescent Reporter Assays Award of Merit
Cynthia Turner Platelet-stimulating Agents Award of Merit
Medical-Legal  
Cognition Studio, Inc. Scarring Down and Obliteration of the Distal Urethra Award of Excellence
Philip Mattes Right Ankle Injuries, Lateral View Award of Excellence
MediVisuals, Inc. Mechanism of Dog Bite Injury to Ear Award of Merit
Illustrated Text (Book) 
Kristen Larson Keil, Mark Schornak, Jennifer Darcy, and Peter Lawrence Color Atlas of Brainstem Surgery Award of Excellence
Jennifer Darcy and Brenda L. Bunch Secondary Rhinoplasty by the Global Masters Award of Merit
Animation:Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial  
INVIVO Communications "How Diabetes Changes Over Time" Award of Excellence
Nucles Medical Media CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing fo Cystic Fibrosis Award of Merit
Animation: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
INVIVO Communications Investigating ribociclib as a potential breast cancer treatment Award of Excellence
iSO-FORM Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Lung Disease Award of Merit
AXS Studio Inc. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism: Effects on bone turnover and parathyroid glands Award of Merit
Animation: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
Amanda Behr and Michael Jensen Infertility Treatments Award of Excellence
Cognition Studio, Inc. MRD and the colonSEQ Assay Award of Merit
Ghost Productions Micromedicine Microfluidics Technology Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial  
Fabian De Kok-Mercado Virus Explorer Award of Excellence/td>
Albert Fung TVA Surg VR Surgical Anatomy Award of Excellence
Andy Matlock Lung Cancer Preoperative Planning Award of Merit
Daniel Muller, Scott Williams, and Scott Leighton Neoplastic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
Argosy Publishing/Visible Bodyd Human Anatomy Atlas 2017 Edition Award of Merit
Simulators, Prosthetics and Sculptural Products 
Jackie Meyer Understanding Myelofibrosis Award of Excellence
Laura Roy Pediatric Cardiac 3D-Printed Teaching Models Award of Merit

   

 

STUDENT CATEGORIES

 
Student Best of Show
Shawna Snyder Vasculature of the Uterus Orville Parkes Best of Show
Sam Holmes Encoding Nature's Chemicals New Media Best of Show
Didactic/Instructional – Anatomical/Pathological  
Lauren Rakes M1 and M2 Segments of the Middle Cerebral Artery Award of Excellence
Shawna Snyder Vasculature of the Uterus Award of Excellence
Eleanor Bailey Infantile Hemangioma Award of Merit
Mark Belan Periodontitis Award of Merit
Judy Rubin Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Surgical/Clinical Procedures  
Julia Lerner Penetrating Keratoplasty Award of Excellence
Jerry Gu Resection of the parasagittal meningioma with preservation of venous lake Award of Merit
Nicholas Reback Surgical Removal of a Carotid Body Tumor Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Molecular/Biological/Life Sciences  
Lisa Qiu Photoswitchable proteins Award of Excellence
Amanda Miller Treating Diabetic Foot Ulcers with Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Award of Merit
Amanda Miller Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) Award of Merit
Hillary Wilson Bower Construction of the Fawn-Breasted Bowerbird Award of Merit
Editorial  
Lisa Knipscher Heart Work Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
Christina Pecora The Line Up: Signs and Symptoms of What's Buggin' Your Belly Award of Merit
Animation  
Sam Holmes Encoding Nature's Chemicals Award of Excellence
Tianxing Shi Comprehensive antibody profiling using Phage ImmunoPrecipitation Sequencing (PhIP-Seq) Award of Excellence
Wendy Gu Imaging Neuropathic Pain Award of Merit
Adam Zunder Rethinking Cancer Award of Merit
Interactive  
Geoff Fraser Muskel: An Interactive Application for Learning Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy Award of Excellence
Tiffany Raber Color Blindness Simulation: A Virtual Reality Experience Award of Excellence
Kelly Speck Trans Primary Care Guide Award of Merit

 

 

 

Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces exhibited in the most recent annual AMI Salon. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! The full list of the salon award winners is below.

All AMI members may exhibit work as Professional members or as Student members. The entries are divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, and advertising, etc. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here.  Please enjoy these online galleries.

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 

PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

Member's Choice Award
David Cheney Arm Orthosis Ralph Sweet Award
Amanda Behr and Michael Jensen Infertility Treatments New Media
Didactic/Instructional: Non-Commercial
David Cheney Rat Facial Nerve Surgery Award of Merit
Scott Weldon Minimally-invasive Modified Nicks Procedure for the Repair of a Small Aortic Root Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional: Commercial  
Amy D'Camp Prokaryotic vs. Eukaryotic Cells Award of Merit
Editorial  
Peter Lawrence Surgery of the Brainstem Award of Excellence
Edmond Alexander Membrane Destruction Award of Merit
Valerie Altounian Synthetic Chromosomes Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
Nick Klein and Andrew Swift Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Lung Disease Award of Excellence
David Cheney Arm Orthosis Award of Merit
Nathaniel Klein Detecting Protein Interactions with High Affinity Bioluminescent Reporter Assays Award of Merit
Cynthia Turner Platelet-stimulating Agents Award of Merit
Medical-Legal  
Cognition Studio, Inc. Scarring Down and Obliteration of the Distal Urethra Award of Excellence
Philip Mattes Right Ankle Injuries, Lateral View Award of Excellence
MediVisuals, Inc. Mechanism of Dog Bite Injury to Ear Award of Merit
Illustrated Text (Book) 
Kristen Larson Keil, Mark Schornak, Jennifer Darcy, and Peter Lawrence Color Atlas of Brainstem Surgery Award of Excellence
Jennifer Darcy and Brenda L. Bunch Secondary Rhinoplasty by the Global Masters Award of Merit
Animation:Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial  
INVIVO Communications "How Diabetes Changes Over Time" Award of Excellence
Nucleus Medical Media CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing fo Cystic Fibrosis Award of Merit
Animation: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
INVIVO Communications Investigating ribociclib as a potential breast cancer treatment Award of Excellence
iSO-FORM Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Lung Disease Award of Merit
Animation: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
Amanda Behr and Michael Jensen Infertility Treatments Award of Excellence
Cognition Studio, Inc. MRD and the colonSEQ Assay Award of Merit
Ghost Productions Micromedicine Microfluidics Technology Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial  
Fabian De Kok-Mercado Virus Explorer Award of Excellence/td>
Albert Fung TVA Surg VR Surgical Anatomy Award of Excellence
Andy Matlock Lung Cancer Preoperative Planning Award of Merit
Daniel Muller, Scott Williams, and Scott Leighton Neoplastic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
Argosy Publishing/Visible Bodyd Human Anatomy Atlas 2017 Edition Award of Merit
Simulators, Prosthetics and Sculptural Products 
Jackie Meyer Understanding Myelofibrosis Award of Excellence
Laura Roy Pediatric Cardiac 3D-Printed Teaching Models Award of Merit

   

 

STUDENT CATEGORIES

 
Student Best of Show
Shawna Snyder Vasculature of the Uterus Orville Parkes Best of Show
Sam Holmes Encoding Nature's Chemicals New Media Best of Show
Didactic/Instructional – Anatomical/Pathological  
Lauren Rakes M1 and M2 Segments of the Middle Cerebral Artery Award of Excellence
Shawna Snyder Vasculature of the Uterus Award of Excellence
Eleanor Bailey Infantile Hemangioma Award of Merit
Mark Belan Periodontitis Award of Merit
Judy Rubin Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Surgical/Clinical Procedures  
Julia Lerner Penetrating Keratoplasty Award of Excellence
Jerry Gu Resection of the parasagittal meningioma with preservation of venous lake Award of Merit
Nicholas Reback Surgical Removal of a Carotid Body Tumor Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Molecular/Biological/Life Sciences  
Lisa Qiu Photoswitchable proteins Award of Excellence
Amanda Miller Treating Diabetic Foot Ulcers with Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Award of Merit
Amanda Miller Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) Award of Merit
Hillary Wilson Bower Construction of the Fawn-Breasted Bowerbird Award of Merit
Editorial  
Lisa Knipscher Heart Work Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
Christina Pecora The Line Up: Signs and Symptoms of What's Buggin' Your Belly Award of Merit
Animation  
Sam Holmes Encoding Nature's Chemicals Award of Excellence
Tianxing Shi Comprehensive antibody profiling using Phage ImmunoPrecipitation Sequencing (PhIP-Seq) Award of Excellence
Wendy Gu Imaging Neuropathic Pain Award of Merit
Adam Zunder Rethinking Cancer Award of Merit
Interactive  
Geoff Fraser Muskel: An Interactive Application for Learning Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy Award of Excellence
Tiffany Raber Color Blindness Simulation: A Virtual Reality Experience Award of Excellence
Kelly Speck Trans Primary Care Guide Award of Merit
 



Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces exhibited in the most recent annual AMI Salon. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! The full list of the salon award winners is below.

All AMI members may exhibit work as Professional members or as Student members. The entries are divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, and advertising, etc. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here .

Please enjoy these online galleries!

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 

PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

 
Member's Choice Award
Jennifer Fairman Z-Ring Stabilization and Constriction Rate Modulation of the ZapA-ZapB-MatP Protein Network Ralph Sweet Award
Edmond Alexander Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Ralph Sweet Award
Joe Samson AR Heart New Media
Didactic/Instructional: Non-Commercial  
Elizabeth Nixon-Shapiro The Renin-Angiotensin System Award of Excellence
Lydia Gregg Causes of ischemia and stroke in the lower thoracic and lumbar spinal cord Award of Merit
Steve Moon Comparative Gross Anatomic Pathology of Common Organ Tumors Award of Merit
Ian Suk Sacral Osteotomy to Correct Pelvic Incidence Angle Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional: Commercial  
Andrew Swift Lymphoma Award of Excellence
Mica Duran MatriStem Anterior Repair — Surgical Technique Guide Award of Merit
Cassio Lynm Burn Award of Merit
Editorial  
AXS Studio Inc. Nature Cover: Postive ID Award of Excellence
Todd Buck Update on Routine Childhood and Adolescent Immunizations Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
Nathaniel Klein Antibody Conjugated Superparamagnetic Magnitite Nanoparticles in the High-Resolution Identification of Small Tumors Award of Excellence
Edmond Alexander Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Award of Merit
Fran Milner Shingles Award of Merit
Cynthia Turner Bone Marrow Award of Merit
Medical-Legal  
Michael Havranek John Doe's Brain Injuries Award of Excellence
Jennifer Darcy John Doe's Facial Trauma and Resulting Surgery Award of Merit
Artery Studios Inc. Left Upper Limb Wound Closure – Johan Schmidt Award of Merit
Hardy Fowler Development of Forehead Flap to Cover Nasal Tip Defect Award of Merit
Illustrated Text (Book) 
Levent Efe Chest Surgery Award of Excellence
Tim Phelps Dance Science: Anatomy, Movement Analysis, Conditioning Award of Merit
vimeo:Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial  
Fabian de Kok-Mercado Coral Bleaching: A Breakdown of Symbiosis Award of Excellence
Elizabeth McDonald,
Mary Beth Clough, and Hoc Kho
Active Transport Award of Merit
The Toronto Video Atlas of Liver, Pancreas and Transplant Surgery Whipple:SMA and SMV Resection and Reconstruction Award of Merit
vimeo: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
Radius Digital Science ABILIFY MAINTENA® Dual Chamber Syringe – Instructions for Use vimeo Award of Excellence
Radius Digital Science Arginine Vasopressin and Hyponatremia Award of Merit
Radius Digital Science Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Diagnostic & Treatment Overview vimeo Award of Merit
Radius Digital Science Constella (linaclotide) for the Treatment of IBS-C and CIC in adults Award of Merit
vimeo: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
Radius Digital Science ELOCTATE™ Fc Fusion vimeo Award of Excellence
Radius Digital Science RenLane™ Renal Denervation System vimeo Award of Excellence
AXS Studio Inc. The i-STAT System Award of Excellence
Stephen Boyd and Heidi Sinsel VERASENSE Sensor-Assisted TKA Award of Merit
Cognition Studio, Inc. The Power of Immunosequencing Award of Merit
vimeo: Medical-Legal  
Artery Studio Inc. Jaw Dysfunction - James Johnson Award of Merit
MediVisuals Inc. Constrained Liner Hip Prosthesis: Device Failure Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial  
Radius Digital Science NEXAVAR® Interactive Case Profile App Award of Merit
AXS Studio Inc. Psoriatic Arthritis Simulator Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial
Yana Hammond BCG Treatment for Bladder Cancer App Award of Excellence
iSO-FORM, LLC Diabetic Macular Edema: Treatment Overview CME Activity Award of Merit
Kimberly M. Knoper, Alison E. Burke, Daniel Muller, Lori Messenger, and Scott Williams Ebola Virus Disease — Current Knowledge Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
AXS Studio Inc. calendAR Award of Excellence
Interactive Media: Interactive Textbook
Digizyme Inc. E.O. Wilson's Life on Earth Award of Excellence
Tasha Obrin From Glucose to ATP: With and Without Oxygen Award of Excellence
Ellen Davis Understanding Heartworm Disease & Treatment: A Veterinary Guide Award of Merit
Simulators, Prosthetics and Sculptural Products 
Heidi Schlehlein Gout Model Award of Merit
     
 
  

 

STUDENT CATEGORIES

 
Student Best of Show
Wai-Man Chan The Trapping Mechanism of the Common Bladderwort Orville Parkes Best of Show
Andrew Tubelli A Molecular Journey through Space and Time New Media Best of Show
Didactic/Instructional – Anatomical/Pathological  
Emily Ling Bronchial Tree: Primary to Secondary Branches Award of Excellence
Kateryna Procunier Glaucoma Award of Excellence
Qingyang Chen Retinitis Pigmentosa Award of Merit
Ashley Hui The Pathology of Diphtheria Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Surgical/Clinical Procedures  
I-Hsun Wu Pterional Craniotomy for Clinoidal Meningioma Award of Excellence
Chi-Chun Liu and Qingyang Chen Medical Legal Elbow Personal Injury Board - The Case of Jessie Jack Award of Merit
Rose Perry Lateral Rectus Recession without adjustable sutures Award of Merit
Mesa Schumacher Aortic Valve Replacement Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Molecular/Biological/Life Sciences  
Wai-Man Chan The Trapping Mechanism of the Common Bladderwort Award of Excellence
Naveen Devasagayam Visualizing a Crowded Human Cell Award of Merit
Diana Grossi Beak Adaptations: A Comparison of Four Diverse Species Award of Merit
Madeline Newcomb PCR and Gel Electrophoresis - Protocol Poster Award of Merit
Editorial  
Jacqueline Kustan VATS Right Lower Lobectomy Award of Excellence
Wai-Man Chan Wounds of War Award of Merit
Caitlin Mock Can Crows Outsmart You? Award of Merit
Kelly Speck SPIN TO RECOVERY: 3D-Printed Spider Silk in Nerve Regeneration Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
Josh Klein Glaucoma Award of Merit
vimeo  
Andrew Tubelli A Molecular Journey through Space and Time Award of Excellence
Jeff Day The Frog in Your Back Award of Merit
Jerry Won Introduction to T cells Award of Merit
Interactive  
Lauren Halligan Clinical Anatomy of the Brainstem Award of Excellence
Megan Llewellyn How Vaccines Work! A Comic Award of Excellence
     
 





Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces exhibited in the most recent annual AMI Salon. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! The full list of the salon award winners is below.

All AMI members may exhibit work as Professional members or as Student members. The entries are divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, and advertising, etc. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here .

Please enjoy these online galleries!

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 

PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

 
Member's Choice Award
Roy Schneider and
Tonya Floyd-Bradstock
Wall Repair Ralph Sweet Award
 AXS Studio Inc. Chick embryo development: 21 days to hatching New Media
Didactic/Instructional: Non-Commercial  
Fabian de Kok-Mercado Genetic Mutations and Disease Award of Merit
Michael King Closure of Paramembranous Ventricular Septal Defect Award of Merit
Ian Suk All-posterior en bloc resection of large cervical tumor Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional: Commercial  
AXS Studio Inc. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) Award of Merit
Editorial  
Cynthia Turner Diabetic Glomerulus Award of Excellence
Alison Burke and
Cassio Lynm
Genomics Award of Merit
Lydia Gregg Future Directions and Current Understanding of Moyamoya Disease Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
Edmond Alexander Cell Mural Award of Merit
Kip Carter Feed Induced Laminitis Award of Merit
Roy Schneider and
Tonya Floyd-Bradstock
Wall Repair Award of Merit
Medical-Legal  
Lindsay Coulter Multiple Traumatic Injuries, Industrial Accident Award of Excellence
Jennifer Darcy Summary of Jane Doe’s Injuries Award of Excellence
Megan Gullotto Pharyngeal Tumor Removal with Hemimandibulectomy, Maxillectomy, and Reconstruction Award of Excellence
Aimee Cammilleri Jane Doe’s 12/16/11 Right Hand Tenolysis Surgery Award of Merit
Artery Studios Overview of injury complications: David Jones Award of Merit
Illustrated Text (Book) 
Kenneth Probst Seven AVMs: Tenets and Techniques for Resection Award of Excellence
Corinne Sandone Atlas of Gastrointestinal Surgery, vol 2, 2nd ed. Award of Merit
vimeo:Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial  
AXS Studio Inc. Chick embryo development: 21 days to hatching Award of Excellence
Nobles Green II Robotic Myomectomy Award of Merit
vimeo: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
Kelvin Li, Leslie Leonard and Elizabeth McDonald Plasmajet Award of Excellence
INVIVO Communications The Science of Biosimilars Award of Merit
vimeo: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
Erin Frederikson and
Elizabeth McDonald
BD Vystra Disposable Pen Award of Excellence
Nucleus Medical Media Custom Animated Patient Education: Mitral Valve Prolapse Award of Merit
vimeo: Medical-Legal  
Artery Studio Inc. Right Knee Impact - Jane Doe Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Non-Commercial  
Kate Campbell Canada’s Great Bear: One Place, Three Stories Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Didactic/Instructional – Commercial
iSO-FORM, LLC BoneBox™ - Dental Award of Excellence
Michael Konomos and
Andy Matlock
Surgical Anatomy of the Liver Award of Excellence
One World DMG Inguinal Hernia App Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Advertising and Marketing/Promotional
One World DMG Endo GIA™ Radial Reload with Tri-Staple™ Technology App Award of Excellence
Interactive Media: Gaming
Argosy Publishing My Incredible Body Award of Merit
Interactive Media: Interactive Textbook
William McAbee and
Brad Gilleland
The Equine Tarsus Award of Merit
Simulators, Prosthetics and Sculptural Products 
Mimic Technologies dV-Trainer - Hydra System Charlotte Holt Award of Excellence
H. Jin Yoon DePuy Synthes Anterior Approach Hip Model Award of Merit
 
  

 

STUDENT CATEGORIES

 
Student Best of Show
Kateryna Procunier The Clinical Significance of the Formation and Growth of a Vestibular Schwannoma Orville Parkes Best of Show
Tasha Obrin The Role of Liver Biochemistry in Blood Tests and Veterinary Medicine New Media Best of Show
Didactic/Instructional – Anatomical/Pathological  
Kateryna Procunier The Clinical Significance of the Formation and Growth of a Vestibular Schwannoma Award of Excellence
Man-San Ma Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva Award of Merit
Christopher Smith Comparison of Head Musculature in Normal and Trisomy 18 Cyclopia Human Fetuses Award of Merit
I-Hsun Wu Segments of the Maxillary Artery Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Surgical/Clinical Procedures  
Christopher Smith Convexity Meningioma Removal Award of Excellence
Jacqueline Meyer Ventral Incisional Hernia Repair Award of Merit
Didactic/Instructional – Molecular/Biological/Life Sciences  
Jeff Day Perching Adaptations in Passerines Award of Excellence
Qingyang Chen Development of intrathecal ectopic lymphoid follicles in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis Award of Merit
Jacqueline Kustan Feeding Behavior of the Pacific Mole Crab Award of Merit
Editorial  
Natalie Cormier Cancer-Curing Frogs Award of Excellence
Dorothy Fatunmbi The Painter’s Hand Award of Merit
Mesa Schumacher The Neutrino’s Secrets Award of Merit
Advertising and Marketing/Promotional  
Jerusha Ellis Taking Care of My Body and Mind: a guide to Canadian mental health services for women living with HIV Award of Excellence
Megan Kirkland Super Doctor Man — A Patient Information Comic Award of Merit
vimeo  
Emily Hromi Solving the Mystery of Stuttering Award of Excellence
Stuart Jantzen Recording the Illuminated Neuron Award of Excellence
Cari Jones Visualizing Adaptations in the Woodpecker Skull Which Confer Traumatic Brain Injury Resistance Award of Merit
Interactive  
Tasha Obrin The Role of Liver Biochemistry in Blood Tests and Veterinary Medicine Award of Excellence
Katelyn McDonald UnderstandSCI Award of Merit
Brendan Polley Form & Function 3D Award of Merit
Andrew Tubelli Taxonomic Biodiversity in Large Zoological Institutions Award of Merit
     
 



Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces from the most recent annual AMI Salon, exhibited in Salt Lake City in July of 2013. 

AMI members may exhibit work in the Professional or Student categories, which are further divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, advertising. 

You can choose to view all images or sort by illustration, vimeo or interactive media.

Please enjoy these online galleries! Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

Be inspired by award-winning medical illustration, medical animation, and interactive applications.

Each year the AMI hosts a Media Exhibition (Salon) of creative and innovative works produced by members of the AMI. It is a showcase for the most recent achievements and advancements in medical visualization, prepared in a wide variety of media, all in one unified and impressive collection on display at the site of the Annual Meeting. Works are judged and awards granted to those that exemplify visual problem solving, content accuracy, creativity, technical execution, clarity, and audience appropriateness.

Medical Illustration Source Book

Here you’ll find searchable illustration portfolios, photography, and animations from professional artists — www.medillsb.com

"How can I become a medical illustrator?"

High school students contemplating medical illustration as a career should take a college preparatory program with as much emphasis on art and science as possible.

In college, students should concentrate on art and biology. Art courses should include drawing, life drawing, painting, color theory, graphic design, illustration, and computer graphics. In the sciences, students should include general biology or zoology, vertebrate anatomy, developmental biology, physiology, chemistry, and cell biology. The science courses must be of the caliber required for science majors.

Admission requirements for the accredited graduate programs in medical illustration vary from program to program. In general, a bachelor's degree with a major in art and a minor in the biological sciences, or a major in science with a minor in art, is preferred. In addition, a portfolio of artwork and a personal interview are generally required. A list of the currently accredited graduate programs can be viewed here.

Post a job

Potential employers and clients can post job announcements by clicking here. Job descriptions are emailed to our 800+ membership and posted in our online member community. The cost to post a job is $200.00. Please note: AMI members can post jobs free of charge.

Hire an expert

Search portfolios in illustration, photography, and animations from professional artists at medillsb.com. They have the scientific training and knowledge to understand your challenge, your choice of media and your audience.

AMI MI Sourcebook logo

 

Client Guide to working with a medical illustrator

You have something important to communicate. Whether it’s a new drug, device, procedure, or research—you need a unique image with which to educate and promote your discovery. Visualizing science and medicine is our business! Medical illustrators have the medical and scientific knowledge to grasp complex scientific information, parse it down, and transmit the essence in a succinct visual message that is accurate, educational, and beautiful.

Working with a medical illustrator and purchasing illustrations, animations, or multimedia may be a new experience for you. This guide of frequently asked questions will help you understand the creative process, pricing, licensing rights, and common business practices used in the industry. The collaborative process that takes place between you (the client) and the image creator (the medical illustrator) reflects a unique synergy where science and art truly meet.

What is a medical illustrator?

Medical illustrators are highly specialized interdisciplinary professionals who have earned advanced degrees from universities affiliated with medical schools. These degrees offer education combining medical science, art, communication, and technology. Many medical illustrators maintain professional competency through board certification with a rigorous commitment to continuing education. A board certified medical illustrator is known as a Certified Medical Illustrator (CMI).

What does a medical illustrator do?

Medical illustrators are unique in their ability to create solutions that translate complex scientific concepts into clear, concise, memorable imagery. Medical illustrators are qualified to serve as content developer, producer, illustrator, designer, animator, director, and/or consultant for instructional and/or promotional materials. They produce visually driven content for print, film, television, web, interactive and mobile media, virtual reality, exhibits, demonstrative evidence, presentations, three-dimensional models, and prosthetics. They can produce new custom illustrations tailored to a client’s specific needs or they can sell rights to existing “stock” illustrations from their image archives.

Partnering with a knowledgeable, professional medical illustrator may deliver a far superior, scientifically accurate, and effective visual solution compared to that produced by a general artist with a science expert’s guidance.

How do I find a qualified medical illustrator?

There are approximately 700 members of the Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI) and an estimated 1,200 practicing medical illustrators in the United States and Canada. To locate a medical illustrator, search by name, area, or specialization in our Medical Illustrator directory or browse and search the Medical Illustration Source Book at www.medillsb.com. Many medical illustrators have their own websites with online portfolios and work with clients locally, nationally and internationally.

How are services provided?

Contacting a medical illustrator at the very beginning of a project provides great advantage in shaping content development because of their medical knowledge, understanding of technology, and artistic expertise. Words and images must be synchronous for the best communication result. A medical illustrator is a content developer and is skilled at contributing to written material as well as creating art.

Below is a general project workflow a client may experience:

A project begins with a consultation by phone, email, or in person to discuss the subject matter and requirements of the project. How will the illustrations, animations or media be used? What reference materials are available? What is the deadline and budget? What reproduction rights are needed?

A proposal is prepared for the client that includes a detailed description of the scope of work, estimate of fees, process for approval and changes, delivery dates, and a licensing contract describing reproduction rights, payment schedule, and other terms and responsibilities.

Once the price and licensing rights are negotiated, both parties sign the proposal contract and work begins. (Sometimes an advance payment may be required to begin work.) The illustrator will research the subject matter and review references, discuss key concepts with the client and/or a content expert, and begin preliminary sketches or storyboards.

Preliminary sketches or storyboards are sent to the client for careful review and correction. One to two rounds of sketch revisions are typical. Additionally, the client may need to approve motion tests, voice-over, and music sound track of an animation project. Thorough communication between the client and illustrator is crucial at this point. Errors and changes discovered after client approval of sketches may be labor and cost intensive to repair.

After the client approves sketches or storyboards in writing, the final illustrations / animations are created. If sketches have been thoroughly reviewed, changes to final artwork should be unnecessary or minimal.

Referencing for legal and regulatory review may augment images or storyboards when needed in commercialization projects.

Final artwork is sent for client review. Upon approval in writing, the high-resolution files are delivered on CD or via the Internet. An invoice is issued with the final product. Prompt payment is important as the grant of licensing rights is typically subject to payment in full.

How do medical illustrators charge?

There are no “standard” prices for medical illustration. Pricing depends on the complexity of the content, the uses and reproduction rights the client desires, and the illustrator’s experience and reputation.

Medical illustration is a service. The product is not “bought,” but the use of it is licensed. In general, the more uses = higher cost. An illustration used in a marketing campaign for a new drug has a higher economic value than the exact same illustration used in a journal article.

Usage fees are determined by:

Nature of use: advertising, magazine, textbook, journal publication, corporate brochure, web site, medical legal exhibit, TV, live presentation, or multimedia project

Exclusive or limited use

Reputation of illustrator

If you have a tight budget, discuss this with the medical illustrator who can advise if it is realistic and what you can expect for your proposed budget.

What usage rights do I need?

The medical illustrator will ask questions about all the different ways you would like to use the images. Based on your needs, a license and correlative price will be prepared.

Below are some sample licensing terms and definitions (for terms not listed, visit the PLUS Licensing Glossary):

One-time Print Use: the limited right to reproduce an image only one time in printed form (paper and ink) in North America (English language). Includes the right to use the illustration at the same or reduced size on the contents page and the right to use the illustration in promotion of the publication, but only in the context of the original printed page.

Online Rights: the limited right to use the illustration in the Internet edition of the publication, but only to accompany the article or text it supports in the original print edition.

Unlimited, Nonexclusive: a grant of rights that permits the buyer use of an image or work across all media types and parameters. A nonexclusive grant does not prevent the illustrator from granting the same rights to other buyers. Unlimited nonexclusive rights may be broad or specifically limited to a media, industry, territory, or time period.

Unlimited, Exclusive: a grant of rights that permits the buyer use of an image or work across all media types and parameters. An exclusive grant allows the artwork to be used only by the one buyer. Unlimited exclusive rights may be broad or specifically limited to a media, industry, territory, or time period.

Transfer of Copyright: an assignment of copyright ownership in a work from the owner to another party. A valid transfer must be contracted in writing and signed by the owner.

Who owns copyright to the illustrations?

In the same way that musicians control who can reproduce their music, medical illustrators control who can reproduce their artwork. Under U.S. and international copyright laws, ownership of creative works is the property of the author (illustrator) from the moment it is created in a tangible form. Ideas and facts are not copyrightable.

Under U.S. Copyright law a copyright consists of a bundle of exclusive rights that include:

Reproduction - right to make copies of a protected work

Distribution - right to sell or distribute copies to the public

Derivative - right to make new works based on a protected work

Performance and display - right to perform a work or to display a work in public

International law protects additional rights including:

Attribution - right to be credited and acknowledged as the creator of the work

Integrity - right to prevent revision, alteration, or distortion of a work that is detrimental to the creator’s reputation

Copyright of an artwork can be sold in whole (called a transfer of copyright), or more commonly, rights may be sold separately with conditions (called licensing). A license is a contract whereby the illustrator who owns the rights, grants reproduction rights to the client to use the artwork for a specific purpose under specific terms in exchange for a fee. When the license expires, those licensed rights revert to the illustrator.

The concept underlying licensing fees is that the reproduction of the creative work produces results for the client and these results have value. The success of a product has a relationship with the quality of the creative work. Thus, the extent of rights licensed bears a relationship to the compensation paid to the creator. Each right has a value. The more rights, the higher the fee. These longstanding and well-established principles are respected and upheld by professional creators and their licensors.

Why can’'t I use the images whenever I want?

If you buy a book, computer software, or a music CD, making that purchase doesn'’t give you the rights to make copies of it or broadcast it to the public. That right remains with the copyright owner. Clients must abide by the terms of the licensing agreement negotiated with the medical illustrator. To use the artwork in an unauthorized manner is copyright infringement.

What if I want to use the images in ways beyond the license?

Should the original use of the artwork exceed your expectations and you wish to extend it, then you can easily negotiate additional usage rights with the medical illustrator.

But I’'ve used illustrators before who let me use the images however I want?

Perhaps they produced the artwork for you as an employee of your company or university. Perhaps you paid for an unlimited use license. There are some medical illustrators who will transfer all copyrights or sign work for hire agreements, but this is not standard practice.

The “Work for Hire” (WFH) provision of US Copyright law is a very narrow exception to the basic rule that the creator of a work owns the copyright. Instead, WFH deems an employer or another commissioning party as the creator of the work and therefore owner of the copyright. If a freelance illustrator signs a WFH contract, the illustrator becomes an employee only for the purposes of surrendering copyright, without receiving any of the benefits of employment. Therefore, most creative professionals consider WFH to be an unfair practice and many refuse to sign these contracts.

Copyright ownership is rarely necessary for clients to obtain the rights to use the creative work for their needs and is generally negotiated at a premium by creative professionals. A thoughtfully crafted license without sale of copyright can generally cover all needs the client requires.
Do I need a license to use images in a lecture or handout?

It depends on whether the lecture is educational or commercial. Fair Use is a provision in US Copyright law that allows limited use of copyrighted material without permission of or payment to the owner. Fair use applies to limited and “transformative” purposes such as: commentary, criticism, news reporting, research, teaching or scholarship.

The question of fair use is one faculty routinely face when teaching and lecturing. Whether you want to photocopy a journal article to distribute in your class, or use images or movies from a publication or the Internet in your lecture, it is important to determine if your use of a protected work is considered a fair use by the four-factor analysis.

The Four-Factor Analysis:

Purpose: commercial / business vs. nonprofit educational, degree of transformation

Nature of the copyrighted work: factual vs. creative, published vs. unpublished

Amount and substantiality: portion vs. whole work, is it the “heart” of the work

Effect: does the use harm the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work

If the lecture is educational (a face-to-face classroom or a podium presentation at a national meeting) then probably yes – fair use applies. If the lecture is commercial (a sales training course or an online Webinar) then probably no – get permission from the copyright owner. You may have to pay a licensing or reuse fee to obtain permission. Permissions to photocopy journal articles or excerpts of books in a classroom coursepack can be obtained through the Copyright Clearance Center or directly from the publisher. Permission to use images and movies in your lecture must be obtained from the copyright owner.

The TEACH Act also allows limited provisions for online and distance education, but only for nonprofit accredited educational institutions (e.g., universities) recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation. Faculty should be very careful when agreeing to have their presentation recorded, posted, or distributed online. Posting of PowerPoint files on a website for download, recording of lectures at national meetings on a website for public viewing, or teaching public webinars –– these uses are not considered face-to-face classroom education, they are widespread Internet distribution. The Fair Use and TEACH Act provisions may not apply. Should your lecture contain copyrighted images or movies used without permission – you may be liable for infringement. Check your lecture and either remove copyrighted content or seek permissions.

It’'s important to remember that fair use is not a right but rather a narrow exception to the creator’s exclusive rights. By claiming fair use of a protected work, you acknowledge that you are not the owner and that you did not seek permission.

What if I’'m required to submit my article in NIH public access?

The NIH Public Access Policy ensures that the public has access to the published results of NIH funded research. It requires scientists to submit final peer-reviewed journal manuscripts that arise from NIH funds to the digital archive PubMed Central upon acceptance for publication. If you have illustrations prepared as part of a manuscript, tell the medical illustrator in advance so that an appropriate license can be granted.

 

Download a printable PDF of the Client Guide

Member Directory

You can access the Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI) online membership directory and search by specialty, state, and name. Many self-employed medical illustrators have their own websites where examples of their work can be seen.

Medical Illustration Source Book

Here you’ll find searchable illustration portfolios, photography, and animation clips from professional artists — www.medillsb.com

What is a medical illustrator?

A medical illustrator is a professional artist with advanced education in both the life sciences and visual communication. Collaborating with scientists, physicians, and other specialists, medical illustrators transform complex information into visual images that have the potential to communicate to broad audiences.

A medical illustrator is a visual problem solver. Background research, including reading scientific papers, meeting with scientific experts, perhaps observing surgery or a laboratory procedure, is often an integral part of the creative process.

The work of medical illustrators promotes education, research, patient care, public relations, and marketing efforts.

What do medical illustrators do?

The field is changing rapidly due to discoveries in both science and technology. From the human genome to the latest robotic surgical technique, the need for accurate effective communication continues to expand.

In the past, the majority of medical illustrators were employed at large medical centers where they worked closely with physicians to produce illustrations for publications such as medical textbooks and scientific journals, as well as instructional videos, films, presentations, and exhibits.

Now, advances in computer graphics and imaging are generating vast new opportunities in which visualization is the key to understanding. Sub-cellular processes too small to be seen even by the most advanced microscopes can come alive through computer animations. A growing need for patients to better understand their state of health and their medical options is expanding the production of medical information aimed at the lay public. The Internet and wireless technology enables information to be widely and readily available on displays that rely on simplified but sophisticated graphics. Attorneys use medical illustration to clarify complex medical information for judges and juries in personal injury and medical malpractice cases.

So, while many medical illustrators still produce illustrations for books and journals, others now act as art directors and producers of a broad range of work from animations and patient education programs to advanced computerized training simulations.

Do medical illustrators specialize?

Medical illustration is a small field with fewer than an estimated 2,000 trained practitioners in the world. Yet, medical illustration is also a diverse field with most professionals developing specialties. Some specialize by subject matter, such as surgery, veterinary medicine, or ophthalmology. Others specialize by media, such as computer animation or the making of three-dimensional models. Others specialize by targeting specific markets such as medical publishing, pharmaceutical advertising, or medical-legal work. Medical illustrators develop considerable knowledge and expertise within their specialty and become an integral part of the production team. Some medical illustrators are authors and co-authors of textbooks or articles in which they've made major contributions to the content.

Where do medical illustrators work?

Approximately one third of medical illustrators are self-employed. They may work primarily alone or they may form creative teams, perhaps with allied professionals such as writers, graphic designers, photographers, or filmmakers. Other medical illustrators work at medical schools, hospitals and clinics, research institutions, medical publishers, law firms, advertising agencies, web/animation firms, and other creative services businesses.

Some medical illustrators evolve throughout their careers into leadership positions as art directors, managers, administrators, faculty members, and business owners.

How are medical illustrators trained?

The majority of medical illustrators in the profession have a master's degree from an accredited two-year graduate program in medical illustration. There are currently four programs in North America that are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). Each program accepts 20 or fewer students each year, so entrance into the schools is very competitive.

Course work varies somewhat from program to program, but all include a combination of basic science courses in anatomy, pathology, microanatomy, physiology, embryology, and neuroanatomy, along with specialized applied art courses such as surgical illustration. Other classes include color theory, instructional design, photography, interactive media development, 3-D modeling and web design, along with traditional drawing and computer applications.

Most programs require master's thesis projects and may have optional courses available in specialty fields such as advanced computer and video graphics, endoscopic illustration, or patient prosthetics.

An increasing number of medical illustrators are choosing to obtain PhD degrees in related fields of science or education, particularly those working in academic settings.

Are there continuing education opportunities for medical illustrators?

The nature of medical illustration demands that practitioners continue to keep up with new developments in both science and communications media. Formal continuing education is available through the AMI. Continuing education credits are offered for workshops presented at the AMI's annual meeting, for AMI-sponsored regional meetings, and for pre-approved courses offered through other educational organizations.

Is there a certification program for medical illustrators?

Yes, the Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators administers a certification program as a recognizable means to signify a practitioner's current competency in the profession. A Certified Medical Illustrator (CMI) has passed examinations dealing with business practices, ethics, biomedical science, and drawing skills, and has undergone a rigorous portfolio review. Competencies are maintained by meeting continuing education requirements and must be renewed every five years. The certification program is based on standards established by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA).

What is the earning potential of a medical illustrator?

Earnings vary according to the experience, education, and ability of the artist, the type of work, and the area of the country where one works. The title "Medical Illustrator" is a broad term. Depending on the type of employer and services provided, job skills may include animation, multimedia, interactive development, illustration, web and graphic design. In general, medical illustrators with diverse skills and more responsibility for concept development command higher salaries. The median salary for a medical illustrator / animator in the U.S. is $70,650 and can range up to $173,000.  The salaries in the AMI compensation surveys reflect AMI member demographics, the majority of whom have a master's degree education in medical illustration from an accredited graduate program. Adept professionals who advance their role to art director or creative director earn between $89,000 - $122,000 and up to $250,000 (2018 AMI survey data). About 48% of salaried illustrators supplement their income with freelance work.

Earning potential for self-employed medical illustrators varies widely depending on the type of work (e.g., pharmaceutical, medical-legal, advertising), education, and an individual’s skill. Success as a self-employed medical illustrator does not result solely from the ability to create beautiful art. Business savvy and ability in marketing and self-promotion, pricing and negotiation, and business management are fundamental. The median income for a self-employed medical illustrator is $80,000 and can range up to $1,000,000 per year (2018 AMI survey data). Due to the vagaries of the marketplace and competitive forces, the earnings of self-employed illustrators may be less predictable than those who are salaried, but the highest earnings are generally made by those artists whose entrepreneurial expertise, art, and professionalism keep them in constant demand.

In addition to earnings from a salary or freelance projects, some medical illustrators receive royalties from secondary licensing of existing artwork. These reuse arrangements with stock art agencies, publishers, and clients can provide a supplemental, and sometimes significant, source of income.

How can I find a qualified medical illustrator?

To find a qualified medical illustrator, you can access the member directory at Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI).

The Medical Illustration Source Book can be viewed at www.medillsb.com. Many self-employed medical illustrators have their own websites where examples of their work can be seen.

Potential employers and clients can post job announcements by contacting our headquarters This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 1-866-393-4AMI. The job descriptions are emailed to our membership and posted in our member community.

Members can post and find job listings by logging into the Member Community.

How can I become a medical illustrator?

High school students contemplating medical illustration as a career should take a college preparatory program with as much emphasis on art and science as possible.

In college, students should concentrate on art and biology. Art courses should include drawing, life drawing, painting, color theory, graphic design, illustration, and computer graphics. In the sciences, students should include general biology or zoology, vertebrate anatomy, developmental biology, physiology, chemistry, and cell biology. The science courses must be of the caliber required for science majors.

Admission requirements for the accredited graduate programs in medical illustration vary from program to program. In general, a bachelor's degree with a major in art and a minor in the biological sciences, or a major in science with a minor in art, is preferred. In addition, a portfolio of artwork and a personal interview are generally required. A list of the currently accredited graduate programs can be viewed here.

A brief history of medical illustration

For over 2000 years artists have illustrated the intricate structure of the body, creating images to elucidate medical procedures and record the pathologies of the body. These illustrations have often endured long after the text of a tome.

Medical illustration created for instruction first appeared in Hellenic Alexandria during the 4th century BC or early 3rd century BC. Created on individual sheets of papyrus, Hellenic illustration covered anatomy, surgery, obstetrics and plants of medical value.

Early anatomic illustration centered on the five-figure series, with each figure representing an organ system diagrammed within a body in a squatting pose, limbs splayed. In contrast, surgical illustrations were more naturalistic covering a wide range of medical procedures.

The Renaissance

Progress accelerated during the Renaissance with many innovations. Artists inspired by Greek and Roman statues created naturalistic representations of the human figure aided by the discovery of the laws of perspective and their own dissections of cadavers. The five-figure series gave way to more accurate representations of anatomy. Graceful anatomical figures were often posed dramatically in landscapes amid bits of classical architecture in startling contrast to the bare backgrounds of earlier and later illustrations.

The Renaissance gave us Leonardo da Vinci, the first medical illustrator in the contemporary sense. Stunningly inventive, he melded a scientific understanding of anatomy with great artistic skill. Leonardo pursued his own anatomy book, and pioneered the use of cross sections and exploded views. Lacking the temperament and resources to publish his work, Leonardo's 800 anatomical drawings remained unpublished until the 1800's.

Major Atlases of Anatomy

As Leonardo neared the end of his career, Andreas Vesalius began his medical career by authoring and publishing De Corpus Fabrica Humani, the most well known book of anatomy ever. Completed in just four years, it influenced medical illustration for centuries. While much is known about Vesalius and the printing of the Fabrica, little is known about the artists who illustrated it leading to speculation revolving around Titian's circle.

In 1725 Berhard Siegfried Albinius of Leyden in the Netherlands asked the Dutch artist and engraver Jan Wandelaar to assist him with a new painstakingly accurate anatomy text. Twenty-eight years were spent producing two books devoted to muscular and skeletal anatomy. The full length plates' graceful poses and lush backgrounds owed much to the Fabrica, but the work was original, unprecedented in accuracy and beautifully engraved.

In the 19th century new printing techniques allowed illustrators to work in a variety of media. Color printing was refined and became practical, helping usher in color atlases of pathology and colorful anatomy books for the public.

Medical Illustration in America

At the end of the 19th century a charming, dapper young artist was persuaded to leave his native Germany and pursue medical illustration at Johns Hopkins. Max Brödel would have an incomparable impact on medical illustration. Almost singlehandedly he would create and define the profession of medical illustration. While his magnificent illustration work in pen and ink, and carbon dust, a technique he devised, are an immense legacy, Brödel's most significant legacy is the first school of medical illustration. In 1911 he became the director of the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine. As the new department's sole instructor he proved himself to be an outstanding natural teacher. Other medical illustration programs sprang up across the United States and Canada. Graduates of Brödel's tutelage and the other schools would transform medical illustration into a profession, leading to the formation of the Association of Medical Illustrators in 1945.

by Alan E. Branigan
Condensed from The History of the Association of Medical Illustrators 1945-1995
edited by Robert Demarest © AMI 1995

 

 
 

Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces from the most recent annual AMI Salon, exhibited in Toronto in July of 2012. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is!

Click here to access a list of 2012 salon award winners.

AMI members may exhibit work in the Professional or Student categories, which are further divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, advertising. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here.

You can choose to view all images or sort by illustration, vimeo or interactive media.

Please enjoy these online galleries!

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

Board Certification Examination Information Bulletin

For in-depth information regarding the Board Certification Examination, see the Certification Examination Information Bulletin [pdf].

What is certification?


ImageCertification is a program endorsed by the AMI to encourage lifelong learning and to measure professional competency for those illustrators and clients who voluntarily desire such credentialing. Similar to specialty certification for physicians, the competency evaluation consists of a written test and a practicum. The Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators (BCMI) objectively measures and evaluates the examination results and awards certification on successful completion. There is no relationship between certification and membership in the AMI.

Board certified medical illustrator


Any practicing medical illustrator who meets the eligibility requirements may apply to become board certified and obtain the designation Certified Medical Illustrator (CMI). The Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators (BCMI) is an independent body that administers this voluntary certification program designed to provide the practicing medical illustrator with the recognizable and valuable CMI credential. A CMI has successfully passed examinations in business practices, ethics, biomedical science, and drawing skills and has undergone a rigorous portfolio review. Please note however, the CMI credential is not necessary or required for a medical illustrator to be a skilled and successful practitioner.

Period of certification


Certification is for a five-year period.

AMI membership is not required


Certification must, under Federal Trade Commission regulations, be open to any qualified medical illustrator whether or not they are members of the AMI or any other professional society.

Standards applied


The certification program and its examination process are based on standards that are used by certification programs and licensing bodies in many diverse professions and occupations. These are the standards established by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). The NCCA was created in 1987 by ICE to help ensure the health, welfare, and safety of the public through the accreditation of a variety of certification programs/organizations that assess professional competence.

Eligibility


You are only eligible to be an applicant for certification if (1) you have a degree from a recognized college/university program in medical illustration that includes a course in human gross anatomy with hands on dissection, proven by transcript; or (2) You have a minimum of five years full-time work experience as a medical illustrator substantiated by letters of reference from employers and proof of a college-level course in human gross anatomy with hands on dissection or its equivalent.

Applying to take the certification exam


A certification exam application, a certification notarization form and the exam fee must be submitted to the BCMI prior to taking the exam.

Certification exam


There are two parts to the examination.

  • Part 1 is a written exam administered once a year at the site of AMI Annual meeting (and at other times and locations by prior arrangement with the Chair of the BCMI).
  • Part 2 consists of an objectively measured portfolio review with some specific requirements in technique and subject matter. Instructions for Part II of the exam are supplied only after successful completion of Part I.


For more in-depth information, see the Certification Examination Information Bulletin [pdf].

Maintaining certification


The CMI credential may be renewed every 5 years by meeting continuing education requirements designed to maintain competencies required for practice. The competent practitioner performs work accurately and in the best interest of the consumer, makes correct judgments, and interacts with other professionals and customers effectively. Competence must be demonstrated and maintained throughout the individual's practicing life.

Renewing your CMI


Renewal of certification requires submission of a renewal application form, payment of a fee, and verification by AMI HQ that your required CEUs have been earned and properly recorded during the 5-year certification term. The CMI exam, in its entirety, must be taken again to regain CMI status if the appropriate number of CEUs is not earned during your 5-year term of certification. 

More info

For more information concerning certification please read the Certification Examination Information Bulletin [pdf] or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  

Application and Forms

Click here to access your account to complete the renewal form, add CE credits to your account, or request CE approval for an activity.

 


Printable versions
Notarization form

Or contact AMI Headquarters at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 



Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces exhibited in the most recent annual AMI Salon. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! The full list of the salon award winners is below.

All AMI members may exhibit work as Professional members or as Student members. The entries are divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, and advertising, etc. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here .

Please enjoy these online galleries!

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 
 



Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces from the most recent annual AMI Salon, exhibited in Baltimore in July of 2011. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is! Click here to access a list of 2011 salon award winners.

AMI members may exhibit work in the Professional or Student categories, which are further divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, advertising. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here.

Please enjoy these online galleries! Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 



Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces from the most recent annual AMI Salon, exhibited in Portland in July of 2010. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is!

AMI members may exhibit work in the Professional or Student categories, which are further divided into categories such as instructional, editorial, advertising. A full listing and descriptions of the categories is available here.

Please enjoy these online galleries! Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

Approved CMI Continuing Education Hours

A list of approved activities can be found by logging into the AMI HUB, clicking “my AMI” in the menu bar, and selecting Continuing Education. All approved activities and courses will be displayed in the “Education Opportunities” list.

Recommended online CE Credit opportunities

For AMI members, the live webinars organized by the Online Learning Committee are recommended for CE credits.
https://hub.ami.org/online-education/webinar-announcement

Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Continuing Education is recommended for biomedical CE credits.
http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/

Harvard Medical School online courses are recommended for biomedical CE credits.
https://globalacademy.hms.harvard.edu/

Medscape CME activities at least 30 minutes long are recommended for biomedical CE credits.
https://www.medscape.org/multispecialty

Live webinars from Science/AAAS are recommended for biomedical CE credits.
https://www.sciencemag.org/custom-publishing/webinars

UpToDate.com is recommended for biomedical CE credits.
http://www.uptodate.com/home/index.html

Yale Online Continuing Medical Education (CME) courses are recommended for biomedical CE credits.
http://cme.yale.edu/

LinkedIn Learning is recommended for Art CE credits.
https://www.linkedin.com/learning

PluralSight.com is recommended for Art CE credits.
https://www.pluralsight.com/browse/creative-professional

The S-P-A-R-K course is recommended for Art CE credits.
https://www.pictureasportal.com/courses/five-strategies-for-the-visual-communication-of-science

A course aggregator may help you find relevant activities, such as https://www.emedevents.com/ or https://www.classcentral.com/

Any activities not already displayed in the “Education Opportunities” list must be submitted for review using a CE Eligibility Application. After attending any approved continuing education activity you must complete a Course Evaluation within 30 days to avoid forfeiting your hours.

There are many online classes available in biomedical sciences, art or business that have not been submitted for approval. If you see something that teaches you what you need, feel free to submit an Eligibility Application and the committee will review it.

Generally speaking, if you find a qualified presenter with a prepared lecture at least 30 minutes long on a relevant topic, with a period for question and answer, chances are it will be eligible for CE hours.

 

Lifelong Learning with Continuing Education

The AMI encourages lifelong learning to ensure professional knowledge and practice for medical illustrators and animators throughout their career. Board Certified Medical Illustrators (CMI) maintain their status by attending approved continuing education courses within a five year period.

See a list of recommended CE courses.

The AMI uses a fully automated system for the submission of requests for Continuing Education (CE) activity approvals and CE credits. You can access all items related to CE and approval of CE activities by clicking here and logging in with your AMI account credentials. 

Requesting CE Activity Approval

To seek approval for education activities such as workshops, courses, or programs not previously approved, log in to your account via the link noted above, and utilize the "CE Eligibility Application". This will generate a request to the CE committee for review and approval. If the activity is approved you will receive an email notification and the activity will appear on the "Education Opportunities" list.

PLEASE NOTE: To avoid disappointment and expense, the activity approval form should be submitted prior to participating in the continuing education activity. If this form is submitted later than 30 days after the activity is completed, CE credit will not be awarded.

Adding CE Credit To Your Account

To add new CE credits to your account, log in to your account at the link above and navigate to the "Certified Medical Illustrator Renewal" option and then click on "Continuing Education". Choose the category of credit you would like to add credit for. Then, from the "Education Opportunities" area you can submit hours for the courses listed. 

PLEASE NOTE: This verification form MUST be submitted within 30 days of completing your activity, or no CE credit will be awarded. The activity is automatically removed from the approved list 30 days after the end date of the activity.

You can view your CE credit record by logging in to your account and clicking on "Certified Medical Illustrator Renewal". For a full FAQ on how to utilize the CE tracking system - click here.

Requirements for maintaining CMI status

Over the 5-year certification period, a total of 35 hours of continuing education (CE) is required to maintain and renew Certified Medical Illustrator (CMI) Status.

The CMI exam, in its entirety, must be taken again to regain CMI status if the appropriate number of CEUs is not earned during the 5-year term of certification.

What are the categories and hour requirements for CE courses/workshops?

A total of 35 CE credit hours is required at the end of the 5-year certification period to retain CMI status.

Required categories:
Art: 14 hours minimum required (21 hours maximum)
Biomedical: 14 hours minimum required (21 hours maximum)

Optional category:
Business: 7 hours is the maximum allowed (business hours are optional)

 

How is CMI status maintained?

  1. Begin acquiring the required 35 CE credit hours by finding courses to take either at the AMI meeting or elsewhere: colleges, universities, museums, hospitals, on line, commercial computer schools, etc. Designated courses and workshops given at the AMI, HeSCA and GNSI meetings are pre-approved for credit. Courses or workshops taken elsewhere require pre-approval for CE credit by the CE committee. For a full FAQ on how to utilize the CE tracking system - click here

  2. Pre-approval of the CE session must be done before the course is taken. Approval is granted by the CE committee, not AMI HQ.

    1. Online
      Fill out the online CE Eligibility Application. This will automatically be emailed to the CE committee. You should receive emailed approval or non-approval from the CE committee chair within 2 weeks.

    If pre-approval is not obtained before taking the course, or within 30 days after the course - at the latest - NO CE CREDIT can be issued.

  3. Take the pre-approved course.

  4. After a course is completed, you must add the credit to your account online. You can access all items related to CE and approval of CE activities by clicking here and logging in with your AMI account credentials.

  5. When the 5-year Certification period ends, you must renew your certification (demonstrating required CEUs) to avoid retaking the CMI exam.

    Renewal of certification requires completion of a renewal application form, payment of a fee, and verification by AMI HQ that your required CE credits have been earned and properly recorded during the 5-year certification term. The CMI exam, in its entirety, must be taken again to regain CMI status if the appropriate number of CEUs is not earned during your 5-year term of certification.

    1. Check your CE credit status (login by clicking here) online to ensure you have sufficient CE credit (in both required categories) to renew your certification.

    2. Complete the renewal process and submit the fee. AMI Headquarters will check your online database record to confirm sufficient CE hours have been earned in order to renew.

  6. Start racking up another 35 hours!

What is the difference between the Continuing Education Committee and the Board of Certification?

The AMI Continuing Education Committee is charged with evaluating courses, workshops etc. given within the AMI meeting and elsewhere, and determine their relevance to the practice of medical illustration. Does that course have meaning and substance for a medical illustrator? Does the course satisfy the IACET criteria and guidelines for awarding CE credits? They recommend to the Board of Certification the required number of CE credit hours and course categories. The CE Committee deals with that five-year period between the time certification begins and the time to renew.

The Board of Certification manages the beginning and end of the certification process by administering the written test and portfolio review that get you certified, and by keeping track of the term expiration dates of certified AMI members. The Board of Certification is not an AMI committee, but an administratively and financially independent entity answering to the AMI Board of Governors on an information basis. The Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators is a member of the National Organization for Competency Assurance (NOCA), which develops standards and accredits organizations that meet those standards. In turn, NOCA is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA), the only national accreditation body for private certification organizations in all disciplines. NOCA's members come from nearly all health professions that need to establish and maintain competency standards.

AMI Continuing Education Committee contacts

Kaitlin Lindsay, CE Committee Chair
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Courtney White, CE Committee Vice Chair
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Ryan Hallman, CE Committee member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Adam Pellerite, CE Committee member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Lori Messenger, CE Committee Member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Anne Erickson, CMI, CE Committee member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jennifer Fairman, CMI, CE Committee member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Carolyn Holmes, CMI, CE Committee member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Julie Coats, CE Committee member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jessica Holland, CE Committee Member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Rob Flewell, CE Committee Member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sigrid Knemeyer, CMI, CE Committee Member
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Application and Forms

Online versions

Certification Exam Application
CMI Login Page (existing CMI's)

 

 

Learn about the Medical Illustration profession, the education and training involved, types of careers available, CMI certification, and a brief history of the medical illustration field. View images and video of recent award-winning illustrations and animations from our yearly Salons, as well as examples of historical medical art.

These image galleries represent the best of medical illustration, medical animation, and interactive applications from Association of Medical Illustration members.

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

 



Images in this gallery represent some of the award-winning pieces from the most recent annual AMI Salon, exhibited in Richmond in July of 2009. We hope it gives you a sense of what an extraordinary exhibit our annual Salon is!

Please enjoy these online galleries! Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a data-copyright violation.

 


Illustrations in this gallery represent the work of several founding AMI members and other North American medical illustrators practicing prior to the establishment of our association.

The traditional media used in these classic illustrations include pencil, carbon dust, pen and ink, and watercolor. Many of these images are housed in archives of medical illustration in various institutions in the US and Canada.

Downloading or reusing the images from this site without written permission is a copyright violation.

Medical illustration is an exciting career that communicates health and science concepts visually. The saying, 'a picture is worth a thousand words' is true. Medical illustrators tell visual stories, such as how to perform a surgery or how a virus works. Their images must be accurate because they have a job to do — teach. Acquiring the skills and knowledge for this career requires insight, talent, and especially education.

Finding an effective education path can seem daunting. The following information is designed to help explore options.

If you're looking to hire a medical illustrator click here.

Common Questions

What does a medical illustrator do?

Medical illustration is a highly specialized field that demands advanced medical and scientific knowledge and skills for solving visual communication problems. Medical illustrators create communication tools in a variety of media for a wide range of audiences, from highly educated biomedical professionals to the lay public. There is an increasing need for highly skilled people to act as translators from the complex world of science to the many audiences that need to understand the world of science and medicine.

You might think that medical illustration would be limited to the creation of images for textbooks and journal articles. While that still is an important role, the profession has expanded enormously in the past decades to include:

  • User experience design
  • Medical animation
  • Molecular simulation
  • Educational game design
  • Health app design
  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality applications
  • Strategic and collaborative design

…and many other complex areas that benefit from intensive study and training.

Medical illustrators provide vital services across the continuum of health professional education, research dissemination, and patient care. Their work must therefore uphold the highest standards of accuracy and efficacy.

How do I become a medical illustrator?

People approach the career of medical illustration from a number of different directions, and there are various educational paths to a degree. People typically start their journey in high school and move on to bachelor and then graduate studies.

You can read some of our member’s paths in AMI Origin Stories [Link to page]. Undergraduate programs offer a broader set of options for those who are looking for a foundational skill set, preparation for a graduate program, or who are more focused on scientific (rather than medical) illustration.

The most common routes involve dual areas of study:

  • the BA/BFA art or illustration student with a major or minor in biology or chemistry
  • the BS biology or pre-med student with a major or minor in art or animation
  • the MS/PhD scientist or MD physician with an interest in visualizing their work

The most effective and direct route to a career in medical illustration is to graduate from one of the accredited master’s programs in the field. These programs undergo rigorous quality reviews, and allow students to study human anatomy via cadaver dissection, conduct research, and develop professional level skills for the workplace.

The AMI welcomes student and professional members from all educational backgrounds.

Is medical illustration the same as scientific illustration, or scientific visualization?

They are closely related: medical illustration can be considered a more specialized form of scientific illustration, with more focussed training on human anatomy, and clinical subjects.

Scientific Illustration

Scientific illustrators draw from observation to accurately depict the natural world. For example, plants (#BotanyArt), animals (#SciArt), astronomy (#AstroArt), and fossils (#PaleoArt). Scientific illustration is often taught at the bachelor’s level. Medical illustration requires further education with master’s-level courses.

Scientific Visualization

Scientific visualization is a rapidly expanding field that touches on statistics, data science, computer science, and design. Medical illustrators sometimes become involved in scientific visualization projects. Scientific visualization (#DataViz) creates graphics from raw data to explore meaning in large data sets. For example, to simulate lab research (#SciViz) or analyze public health (#HealthViz). Biological data viz (#BioViz) uses microscopy and other cell imaging systems. It entails use of computer graphics, 3D animation, human-computer interaction, and design. Data visualization is often taught at the master’s level in computer science, bioinformatics, or computational biology.


Curriculum

Course work varies from program to program, but all include an advanced course in human anatomy with dissection and may include a combination of other biomedical science courses such as embryology, histology, neuroanatomy, cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, physiology, pathology, immunology, pharmacology or genetics, along with specialized applied art courses such as surgical and/or medical-legal illustration. Other classes may include learning and instructional design, interactive media development, data visualization, molecular visualization, graphic medicine, 3-D modeling and animation, along with traditional drawing and computer applications.

Programs require master's thesis or research projects and may have optional courses available in specialty fields such as advanced interactive media studies, endoscopic illustration, or patient prosthetics.

How are educational programs assessed for quality?

Accredited graduate programs in medical illustration are rigorously assessed for the quality of their programs on an ongoing basis.

    Please note: There are two kinds of accreditation: institutional and programmatic.
  • Institutional accreditation is a quality assurance process that looks at a university or college as a whole, and is therefore very general.
  • Programmatic accreditation is a quality assurance process that measures a particular program’s performance against a detailed set of standards, and is therefore very specific.

There is no programmatic accreditation for undergraduate programs in this field.

This programmatic accreditation of graduate programs in medical illustration is overseen by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). In the case of medical illustration programs, this process is managed by the Accreditation Review Committee for the Medical Illustrator (ARC-MI) of the AMI, a committee of the AMI and CAAHEP.

The mission of the ARC-MI is to establish, maintain, and promote appropriate standards of quality for educational programs in medical illustration, and to recommend accreditation status to CAAHEP for educational programs which meet or exceed these standards. ARC-MI and CAAHEP only accredit graduate programs in medical illustration, not individual faculty members.

ARC-MI develops and regularly updates standards for entry-level competencies for medical illustrators. These are based on several outcome measures, including employer and graduate assessment of the program’s effectiveness in developing appropriate knowledge, skills, and behavior in their graduates. Programs are also assessed for their positive employment rates, comprehensive examinations, evaluations by clinical faculty, graduate scholarly output, and other professional achievements of graduates. Standards for Entry-Level Competencies were initially adopted in 1987 and revised in 1992, 1998, 2003, 2008, and 2014. Revisions continue on a regular basis.

This accreditation program has resulted in decades of high-quality training. As part of accreditation, graduate programs are required to post outcome measures on their web sites. Currently this includes 5-year averages of "positive placement" rates for the period 6 -12 months post-graduation. Positive Placement means that the graduate is employed full or part-time in a related field, and/or continuing their education, and/or serving in the military. These rates demonstrate the outstanding performance of accredited graduate programs in medical illustration.

Recent positive placement rates for currently accredited programs:

  • Augusta University: 97.7%.
  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: 97%
  • University of Illinois at Chicago: 94.6%
  • University of Toronto: 95%
  • Complete information on these graduate programs can be viewed here.

    In Europe, the Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI) runs a separate accreditation program. For an updated list of accredited European programs, visit the IMI education page.

I am in high school; how do I prepare for a medical illustration program?

High school students thinking about medical illustration as a career should take a college preparatory program with as much emphasis on art and science as possible. Early development of direct observational drawing skills is a helpful first step.

Students should concentrate on:

  • Science preparation via classwork in introductory biology, chemistry, anatomy/physiology, physics, and cell or molecular biology. These core highschool and prepatory level classes can help prepare students for undergraduate level science/biology courses.

  • Visual art preparation via classwork with a focus on drawing from direct observation (still life studies), figure drawing from life, portraiture from life, painting, color theory.These core highschool and prepatory level classes can help prepare students for undergraduate level arts courses.

I am looking for an undergraduate program; what should I be thinking about?

Undergraduate programs are a primary pathway for students looking to enter the field of medical illustration. They also offer a common stepping stone to applying for a medical illustration graduate program. While each undergraduate program is unique, they offer a common education pathways by focusing on art and science/biology. During undergraduate studies, students should concentrate on:

  • Science preparation via courses in introductory biology, vertebrate anatomy, physiology, and cell or molecular biology. The science courses must be of the caliber required for science majors. Additional coursework may include chemistry, developmental biology, zoology, molecular biology, histology, biochemistry, immunology, embryology, pharmacology, genetics, or neuroscience.

  • Visual art preparation via courses with a focus on drawing from direct observation (still life studies), figure drawing from life, portraiture from life, painting, color theory, graphic design, illustration, and digital media (raster or vector software). Additional coursework may include field sketching, sequential illustration, 3D modeling, 2D or 3D animation and web/interactive design.

These courses can be taken in a variety of degree programs. For instance, medical illustration graduate students may have a bachelor's degree with a major in art and a minor in the biological sciences, a bachelor's degree with a major in science and a minor in art, a doctoral degree in science or medicine with additional art studies, an undergraduate degree in Biological and Pre-medical Illustration, or additional types of undergraduate degrees. Therefore, focus should remain on the above recommended mix of science and art studies with attention to course work and portfolio requirements of specific programs of interest.

Students may benefit from undergraduate programs in Scientific Illustration, Biological Illustration, or Pre-Medical Illustration that focus on preparation for medical illustration graduate programs. Students who are unable to attend such programs should not feel discouraged from applying to graduate programs so long as coursework and portfolio requirements are met.

A list of undergraduate programs are available here.

If you are considering an undergraduate program that purports to teach scientific/medical illustration, keep these questions in mind:

  • Does the program offer anatomy training with dissection (where legally permissible)?
  • Does the program provide the prerequisites for graduate study at a target graduate program?
  • Does the program offer opportunities for undergraduate research experiences? These can make a student more attractive to a graduate program.
  • Does the program employ experienced medical illustrators as instructors? Do the instructors have CMI certification?

Things to be aware of in claims of accreditation

There are two kinds of accreditation: Institutional & Programmatic.

  • Institutional accreditation is a quality assurance process that looks at a university or college as a whole, and is therefore very general.

  • Programmatic accreditation is a quality assurance process that measures a particular program’s performance against a detailed set of standards, and is therefore very specific.*There is no programmatic accreditation for undergraduate programs in this field.

I am looking for a graduate program: what are my options?

A terminal degree in Medical Illustration is at the graduate level. This higher level of education prepares students to enter this expanding field. There are currently three programs in the United States and one in Canada that are accredited by CAAHEP through the AMI:

  • Augusta University, MS Medical Illustration
  • Johns Hopkins University, MA Medical and Biological Illustration
  • University of Illinois at Chicago, MS Biomedical Visualization
  • University of Toronto, MSc Biomedical Communications

These programs accept between approximately 7 to 20 students each year, so entrance into the schools is highly competitive.Application requirements vary by graduate program. Visit each institution's website for details. The complete list of graduate programs can be viewed here.

I’m a clinician/health professional/PhD looking to enter the field; what are my options?

Some medical illustrators come to the profession having achieved doctoral degrees in related fields of science or education or having professional standing as a clinician or health professional. Graduate programs are sometimes an option for these individuals, but there are also additional post-graduate programs and certificates, which are listed here.


Admissions

While all programs tend to have a common focus on art and science/biology, the admission requirements vary from program to program. In addition, a portfolio of artwork and an interview are required for applications to accredited graduate programs in Medical Illustration. Since admission requirements for these programs vary, please consult the school to which you are applying for specific requirements: Undergraduate | Graduate.


Post-graduate & Continuing Education Information

What are the career and salary options like for medical illustration graduates?

Please see our Careers page; see sections “Earning Potential” and “Employment outlook”.

Is there a certification or licensure process for medical illustrators?

There is an optional certification program offered by the Board of Certification of the Medical illustrator, leading to a Certified Medical Illustrator (CMI) credential. There are no license requirements to practice as a medical illustrator.

Are there continuing education opportunities in medical illustration?

The nature of medical illustration demands that practitioners keep up with new developments in artistic technique, science and communication. Formal continuing education is available through the AMI and other venues. Continuing education credits are offered for workshops presented at the AMI's annual meeting, for AMI-sponsored regional meetings throughout the United States and Canada, and for pre-approved courses offered through other educational organizations. These opportunities can count toward the continuing education requirements of the CMI program.

In addition to continuing education credits, a variety of post-graduate certification and programs are available throughout North America and Europe.Visit the complete list here.

caahep

Currently four graduate medical illustration programs in North America are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) upon recommendation from the Accreditation Review Committee for the Medical Illustrator (ARC-MI). These programs are indicated with the CAAHEP logo (right). More information on this rigorous quality assurance system is available here.

In Europe, the Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI) runs a separate accreditation program. For an updated list of accredited European programs, visit the IMI education page.

Master’s Degree Programs in Medical Illustration — North America

caahep

Augusta University (formerly Georgia Regents University)

MSMI degree, two-year curriculum
Program Director: Bill Andrews, MA, CMI, FAMI
Dept. of Medical Illustration
Tel: (706) 721-3266
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: http://www.augusta.edu/medart
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AUGMedArt
Instagram: @aug_medart
Twitter: @aug_medart

 

caahep

University of Illinois at Chicago

M.S. degree, two-year curriculum
Director: John Daugherty, MS, CMI, FAMI
Biomedical Visualization
Tel: (312) 996-4975
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: http://ahs.uic.edu/biomedical-health-information-sciences/admissions-and-programs/ms-in-biomedical-visualization/
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/uic.bvis
Instagram: @uic_bvis
Twitter: @UIC_BVIS

 

caahep

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

M.A. degree, two-year curriculum
Director: David Rini, MFA, CMI, FAMI
Medical and Biological Illustration Graduate Program Department of Art as Applied to Medicine
Tel: (410) 955-3213
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: https://medicalart.johnshopkins.edu
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jhumedart
Twitter: @jhumedart

 

caahep

University of Toronto

M.Sc.BMC degree, two-year curriculum
Director: Jodie Jenkinson, BA, MScBMC, PhD, FAMI
Biomedical Communications
Tel: (905) 569-4849
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: https://www.bmc.med.utoronto.ca/bmc/
Twitter: @MScBMC
Instagram: @mscbmc

 
 
caahep

Rochester Institute of Technology

MFA Medical Illustration (2 years)
Director: Jim Perkins, MFA, CMI, FAMI
Tel: (585) 475-2443
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: https://www.rit.edu/study/medical-illustration-mfa

Master’s Degree Programs in Medical/Scientific Illustration — Europe
 

Zuyd University / Maastricht University - Netherlands

MFA and Design, Scientific Illustration (2 years)
Web: https://www.zuyd.nl/en/programmes/master-fine-art-and-design-scientific-illustration

 

Ecole Estienne – Paris, France

DSAA Scientific Illustration Design (2 years)
Web: http://www.ecole-estienne.paris/formation/dsaa-design-illustration-scientifique/presentation/
 

University of Dundee - Scotland

MSc Forensic Art and Facial Imaging, postgraduate (1 year)
Web: https://www.dundee.ac.uk/postgraduate/forensic-art-facial-imaging
 

University of Dundee - Scotland

MSc Medical Art, postgraduate (1 year)
Web: https://www.dundee.ac.uk/postgraduate/medical-art
 

Liverpool John Moores University - UK

MA Art in Science, postgraduate (1 year)
Web: https://www.ljmu.ac.uk/study/courses/postgraduates/art-in-science-ma

Scholarships for graduate education may be available through the programs in medical illustration; please contact the programs directly.

Vesalius Trust

logo-Vesalius-TrustThe Vesalius Trust for Visual Communication in the Health Sciences offers Research Grants and The Inez Demonet Scholarship each year to qualifying students. Applications for the scholarships are received and evaluated by the AMI Scholarship Committee.

Qualifications

Students who have completed at least one year of full-time study in a degree program for visual communications in the health sciences may apply for Research Grants. Inez Demonet scholarship applicants must be enrolled in a CAHEEP-accredited program to be eligible. Applications are made available in the fall. Scholarships are described below.  Click here for Frequently Asked Questions.

Research Grants

Grant money is made available each year by the Vesalius Trust to fully or partially fund meritorious student research projects/theses. Award size may vary based on the nature and merit of a project. Applications are evaluated and ranked by the AMI Scholarship Committee. Not all who apply are awarded funding.

The top two awards in this category are named in honor of Alan W. Cole, beloved and respected medical illustrator and long-time member of the Association of Medical Illustrators, and Joyce McGill, aunt of Gael McGill, PhD, Digizyme CEO, Director of Molecular Visualization at Harvard Medical School and past Vesalius Trust trustee who created this scholarship in memory of Joyce whose life was dedicated to teaching art.

There are three parts to the application - student application, faculty advisor form, and content advisor form. Please note the second advisor should be someone oustide of your medical illustration faculty. You will need to send the links for the appropriate forms to your 2 advisors and ask them to fill it out by the application deadline.

Vesalius Trust Student Application
Submit Faculty Advisor Form
Submit Content Advisor Form

Inez Demonet Scholarship

The Inez Demonet Scholarship is an annual merit scholarship awarded to the applicant with highest academic and personal achievements in the field of visual communications in the health sciences. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited program to be eligible. The Demonet award was the first scholarship established by the Trust. This scholarship honors a well-known, respected medical illustrator who was a charter member of the Association of Medical Illustrators. Click here for Frequently Asked Questions.

About Inez Demonet

Inez Demonet was a charter member of the Association of Medical Illustrators and chief of the Medical Arts Section at the National Institutes of Health for many years. She was a specialist in maxillofacial and plastic surgery illustration and was the recipient of a number of national honors for her work. A very versatile and creative professional, she was also a member of the Washington Water Color Club, the Society of Washington Printmakers and the Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. In her will, she bequeathed a sum of money to fund a scholarship in her name. In honor of her many talents and accomplishments, the Trust awards this scholarship each year to the student considered to be the best overall student with the most promise for contributions to the profession of medical illustration in the future. In accordance with her bequest, this scholarship is available only to students of programs currently accredited by the Association of Medical Illustrators.

Inez Demonet Student Application

What is the field of medical illustration?

Medical illustration is a unique applied art discipline comprised of professional medical illustrators and animators. It falls within the more general field of biomedical communication.

What is a medical illustrator / animator?

A medical illustrator is a professional artist with specialized training and advanced education in medicine, science, art, design, visual technology, media techniques, and in theories related to communication and learning. Collaborating with scientists, physicians, and other content specialists, medical illustrators serve as visual translators of complex technical information to support education, medical and life science research, patient care, patient education, public relations, and marketing objectives.

As visualization specialists, they create imagery that advances medical science knowledge and empowers health literacy for patients and the public. They have the medical and scientific knowledge to grasp complex information, distill it down and communicate the story in a clear visual narrative that is accurate, educational and engaging.

In addition to producing such material, medical illustrators often function as content developers, creative directors, consultants and administrators within the general field of biocommunication. Many are business owners and entrepreneurs in the marketplace.

The definition of a medical illustration

A medical illustration is a visual representation that is the result of art skills expressed in a tangible or virtual medium that conveys medical or biological information. An illustration or animation is meant to explain and clarify a complex subject in ways that words alone cannot. Clear communication is a key feature of medical illustration that sets it apart from science-inspired fine art.

 de Kok F 12A 2 web        Coulter medicolegal

Examples of molecular illustration by Fabian de Kok-Mercado (left) and a medical legal exhibit by Lindsay Coulter (right).
 

Where medical illustrations & animations are used

From the human genome to the latest robotic surgical technique, the demand for accurate, effective medical illustration is continuously expanding. Medical illustrations and animations appear in virtually all media and markets used to disseminate medical, biological and related information:

  • trade and consumer publicationsMedical Illustration industries markets
  • textbooks, journals, eBooks
  • Web
  • courtroom exhibits
  • patient education
  • continuing medical education (CME)
  • interactive learning
  • advertising
  • mobile health apps
  • health games
  • trade shows
  • museums
  • veterinary and dental markets
  • television and film
  • augmented and virtual reality simulators

 

Attorneys use medical illustration to clarify complex medical information for judges and juries in personal injury and medical malpractice cases.

While medical illustrations are widely and consistently used for print and exhibits, the trend is toward greater use in multimedia and interactive designs, particularly those involving animation. Many, but not all, medical illustrators also work in three dimensions, creating sculptured anatomical teaching models and museum exhibits, models for simulated medical procedures and prosthetic parts for patients.

Skills required to be a medical illustrator / animator

Content and anatomical accuracy is paramount in the field of medical illustration; images are designed and created to communicate specific content. Therefore, it is most rewarding for detail-oriented individuals who genuinely enjoy and have natural ability in both art and science.

Creative services ALLBecause of the variety of assignments medical illustrators typically experience, they should be accomplished in a wide range of art methods and media production skills to meet the current needs of the biocommunication industry. These methods and skills range from advanced drawing, painting and sculpture techniques in tangible media, to functional concepts and techniques involved in the production of commercial and graphic art, to up-to-date computer graphic skills in still and motion media.

A strong foundation in general, biological and medical science is also necessary to enable the illustrator to fully comprehend and then conceptualize complex biological and medical information. Subjects range from structures in the real world that can be directly observed to the theoretical and unseen, such as molecular processes. Highly developed visualization skills to transform such complex information into two-dimensional and three-dimensional images that communicate to diverse audiences are essential.

Those interested in medical illustration should enjoy working alone and in teams during problem-solving, and be able to work closely with clients to understand not only the project itself but the client's often unspoken needs as well. Writing, research and ancillary computer skills are also valuable.

A proven pathway to acquire the required skills and knowledge to be a professional medical illustrator in today's marketplace is to attend a graduate-level educational program that is dedicated to teaching medical illustration.

Education for a career in medical illustration

Most medical illustrators have a Master's degree from an accredited graduate program from one of four medical schools. There are currently three accredited programs in the United States and one in Canada, each accepting 20 or fewer students per year. Entrance into all of these schools is very competitive. Course work includes:

  • human gross anatomy
  • physiology
  • pathology
  • histology
  • neuroanatomy
  • embryology
  • surgery

 

Students concurrently take classes in everything from the use of electronic media in surgical and conceptual illustration to storyboard creation, interactive media development, web design, animation, 3D modeling, and prosthetics. Graduate programs in medical illustration are two years in length, and admission requirements vary from program to program. For further information on educational programs to obtain a degree in medical illustration, please see Education.

Where do medical illustrators work?

Medical illustrators and animators traditionally work at a:

  • University, academic medical center
  • Hospital, clinic, or medical practice
  • Research institution
  • Association (trade or society)
  • Publishing company (books or journals)
  • Software / app company
  • Medical education company
  • Medical legal or law firm
  • Science communication or animation studio
  • Veterinary school
  • Pharmaceutical, device or biotech company
  • Advertising agency
  • Federal government, military

 

Today, many are self-employed while others set up small companies or work as an employee or owner in larger commercial enterprises designed to provide services to various markets.

A significant segment of the marketplace is devoted to medical legal illustration, which focuses on producing demonstrative evidence to support expert testimony in medical malpractice, personal injury, and product liability litigation. Fast growing fields of work for the medical illustrator are in computer modeling, animation and interactive design, all of which are in high demand in a wide variety of markets, and which often require larger teams of individuals.

Some medical illustrators specialize in a particular facet of medicine, such as forensic reconstruction, ophthalmological illustration, a specific surgical specialty, or the making of prostheses, often accumulating considerable recognition for their knowledge and abilities in that particular area. Some illustrators become content experts and are authors and co-authors of textbooks or journal articles.

There is an expanding need for those proficient in interactive UX/UI design to create e-learning mobile apps, AR/VR platforms, mixed-reality simulations, games, instructional platforms, MOOCs and other applications.

As more people demand information about their own bodies and healthcare options, the role of medical illustrations and animations in patient education and health literacy initiatives is vital to improving public health and patient outcomes. Indeed, a picture is worth a thousand words.

A growing number of medical animators work in research labs analyzing and modeling research data and molecular interactions to guide the data-exploration process as the scientific story is unfolding. Interdisciplinary knowledge in biochemistry, genomics, and computational molecular biology enable this close interaction and blur the lines between scientist and artist.

Earning potential

Earnings vary according to the experience, education, and ability of the artist, the type of work, and the area of the country where one works. The title "Medical Illustrator" is a broad term. Depending on the type of employer and services provided, job skills may include animation, multimedia, interactive development, illustration, web and graphic design. In general, medical illustrators with diverse skills and more responsibility for concept development command higher salaries.  The salaries in the AMI compensation surveys reflect AMI member demographics, the majority of whom have a master's degree education in medical illustration from an accredited graduate program.

The median salary for a medical illustrator / animator in the U.S. is $70,650 and can range up to $173,000. Those with interdisciplinary skills in UX design who create apps and AR / VR experiences are in demand and earn $74,880 - $98,000. Adept professionals who advance their role to art director or creative director earn between $89,000 - $122,000 and up to $250,000 (2018 AMI survey data). About 48% of salaried illustrators supplement their income with freelance work.

Earning potential for self-employed medical illustrators varies widely depending on the type of work (e.g., pharmaceutical, medical-legal, advertising) and an individual’'s skill and reputation. Success as a self-employed medical illustrator does not result solely from the ability to create beautiful art. Business savvy and ability in marketing and self-promotion, pricing and negotiation, and business management are fundamental. Due to the vagaries of the marketplace and competitive forces, the earnings of self-employed illustrators may be less predictable than those who are salaried, but the highest earnings are generally made by those artists whose entrepreneurial expertise, art, and professionalism keep them in constant demand.

The median income for a self-employed medical illustrator is $80,000 and can range up to $1,000,000 per year (2018 AMI survey data).

In addition to earnings from a salary or freelance projects, some medical illustrators receive royalties from secondary licensing of existing artwork. These reuse arrangements with stock art agencies, publishers, and clients can provide a supplemental, and sometimes significant, source of income.

Employment outlook

Currently, the employment outlook for medical illustrators is good due to the highly specialized nature of our work and the relatively limited number of medical illustrators graduating each year. The profession remains very viable due to growth in medical research that continually reveals new treatments and technologies that require medical illustrations and animations to explain them.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, “Demand for multimedia artists and animators will increase as consumers continue to demand more realistic video games, movie and television special effects, and 3D animated movies. Additional job openings will arise from an increasing need for computer graphics in the growing number of mobile technologies. The demand for animators is also increasing in alternative areas such as scientific research and design services.”

Medical illustrators are also employed as research faculty within healthcare institutions where their unique aptitude is valuable in visualizing, interpreting and summarizing data as well as creating effective, testable patient education tools. Lastly, emerging technologies in informational media delivery systems such as mobile devices (tablets and smart phones), health gaming, and digital medical imaging systems require an expanding array of specially designed digital images and thus, the need for newer, more cutting-edge medical illustrations and animations to populate these devices.

Board certification

Many medical illustrators choose to enhance their careers by becoming board certified. Certification is a program endorsed by the AMI to encourage lifelong learning and to measure professional competency for practicing medical illustrators. This voluntary program is designed to provide the practicing medical illustrator with the recognizable and valuable Certified Medical Illustrator (CMI) credential, which assures stakeholders of their current competency in the profession.

A Certified Medical Illustrator has successfully passed examinations dealing with business practices, ethics, biomedical science, drawing skills, and has undergone a rigorous portfolio review. Competencies are maintained by meeting specific continuing education requirements and must be renewed every five years. For more information see Board Certification.

Continuing education

Medical illustration is a profession in continual growth. Medical research is embedded in nearly every medical illustration assignment, sometimes requiring learning to use medical instrumentation, performing cadaver dissections, organizing computer searches or studying relevant medical articles.

Like most other disciplines dependent on digital technology, medical illustrators also have to keep up with trends in emerging media as well as undergo periodic training to learn new platforms or software. To help the medical illustrator remain current, the AMI maintains a listserv, publishes a weekly AMI eNews, offers member tutorials and online courses, and co-publishes an academic journal The Journal of Biocommunication.

In order to maintain certification, however, more formal continuing education is available through the AMI as well as outside educational venues. Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credits are offered for workshops and educational sessions presented at AMI annual meetings, at AMI-sponsored regional meetings, and for educational experiences in outside venues that meet the criteria for CEUs.

Positions for medical illustrators, medical animators, project managers, art directors and medical illustration faculty can be found in the member community. Members must log-in to post and find jobs.

There are multiple ways to locate a medical illustrator:

1. Potential employers and clients can post job announcements by contacting our headquarters: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 1-866-393-4AMI, or submitting the form below. The job descriptions are emailed to our membership and posted in our member community.

2. The majority of the approximately 700 members of the Association of Medical Illustrators (AMI) are listed in our online database. If you wish to contact a specific medical illustrator, you can search for AMI members by name, state, or specialization.

3.The Medical Illustration Source Book, showcasing samples of AMI members work, can be viewed at www.medillsb.com.

{philaform 7}

What is certification?

CMI logoCertification is a program endorsed by the AMI to encourage lifelong learning and to measure professional competency for those illustrators and clients who voluntarily desire such credentialing. Similar to specialty certification for physicians, the competency evaluation consists of a written test and a practicum. The Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators (BCMI) objectively measures and evaluates the examination results and awards certification on successful completion. There is no relationship between certification and membership in the AMI.

Board certified medical illustrator

Any practicing medical illustrator who meets the eligibility requirements may apply to become board certified and obtain the designation Certified Medical Illustrator (CMI). The Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators (BCMI) is an independent body that administers this voluntary certification program designed to provide the practicing medical illustrator with the recognizable and valuable CMI credential. A CMI has successfully passed examinations in business practices, ethics, biomedical science, and drawing skills and has undergone a rigorous portfolio review. Please note however, the CMI credential is not necessary or required for a medical illustrator to be a skilled and successful practitioner.

Period of certification

Certification is for a five-year period.

AMI membership is not required

Certification must, under Federal Trade Commission regulations, be open to any qualified medical illustrator whether or not they are members of the AMI or any other professional society.

Standards applied

The certification program and its examination process are based on standards that are used by certification programs and licensing bodies in many diverse professions and occupations. These are the Standards established by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). The National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) was created in 1987 by ICE to help ensure the health, welfare, and safety of the public through the accreditation of a variety of certification programs/organizations that assess professional competence.

Eligibility

You are only eligible to be an applicant for certification if (1) you have a degree from a recognized college/university program in medical illustration that includes a course in human gross anatomy with hands on dissection, proven by transcript; or (2) You have a minimum of five years full-time work experience as a medical illustrator substantiated by letters of reference from employers and proof of a college-level course in human gross anatomy with hands on dissection or its equivalent.

Applying to take the certification exam

A certification exam application, a certification notarization form and the exam fee must be submitted to the BCMI prior to taking the exam. 

Certification exam

There are two parts to the examination.

Part 1 is a written exam administered once a year at the site of AMI Annual meeting (and at other times and locations by prior arrangement with the Chair of the BCMI).

Part 2 consists of an objectively measured portfolio review with some specific requirements in technique and subject matter. Instructions for Part II of the exam are supplied only after successful completion of Part I.

For more in-depth information, see the Certification Examination Information Bulletin [pdf].

Maintaining certification

The CMI credential may be renewed every 5 years by meeting continuing education requirements designed to maintain competencies required for practice. The competent practitioner performs work accurately and in the best interest of the consumer, makes correct judgments, and interacts with other professionals and customers effectively. Competence must be demonstrated and maintained throughout the individual's practicing life.

Renewing your CMI

Renewal of certification requires submission of a renewal application form, payment of a fee, and verification by AMI HQ that your required CE credits have been earned and properly recorded during the 5-year certification term. The CMI exam, in its entirety, must be taken again to regain CMI status if the appropriate number of CE credits is not earned during your 5-year term of certification.

More info

For more information concerning certification please read the Certification Examination Information Bulletin [pdf] or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Prior to the Founding of the Association of Medical Illustrators

For over 2000 years artists have illustrated the intricate structure of the body, creating images to elucidate medical procedures and record the pathologies of the body. These illustrations have often endured long after the text of a tome.

Medical illustration created for instruction first appeared in Hellenic Alexandria during the 4th century BC or early 3rd century BC. Created on individual sheets of papyrus, Hellenic illustration covered anatomy, surgery, obstetrics and plants of medical value.

Early anatomic illustration centered on the five-figure series, with each figure representing an organ system diagrammed within a body in a squatting pose, limbs splayed. In contrast, surgical illustrations were more naturalistic covering a wide range of medical procedures.

Renaissance

Progress accelerated during the Renaissance with many innovations. Artists inspired by Greek and Roman statues created naturalistic representations of the human figure aided by the discovery of the laws of perspective and their own dissections of cadavers. The five-figure series gave way to more accurate representations of anatomy. Graceful anatomical figures were often posed dramatically in landscapes amid bits of classical architecture in startling contrast to the bare backgrounds of earlier and later illustrations.

The Renaissance gave us Leonardo da Vinci, the first medical illustrator in the contemporary sense. Stunningly inventive, he melded a scientific understanding of anatomy with great artistic skill. Leonardo pursued his own anatomy book, and pioneered the use of cross sections and exploded views. Lacking the temperament and resources to publish his work, Leonardo's 800 anatomical drawings remained unpublished until the 1800's.

Major Atlases of Anatomy

As Leonardo neared the end of his career, Andreas Vesalius began his medical career by authoring and publishing De Corpus Fabrica Humani, the most well known book of anatomy ever. Completed in just four years, it influenced medical illustration for centuries. While much is known about Vesalius and the printing of the Fabrica, little is known about the artists who illustrated it leading to speculation revolving around Titian's circle.

In 1725 Berhard Siegfried Albinius of Leyden in the Netherlands asked the Dutch artist and engraver Jan Wandelaar to assist him with a new painstakingly accurate anatomy text. Twenty-eight years were spent producing two books devoted to muscular and skeletal anatomy. The full length plates' graceful poses and lush backgrounds owed much to the Fabrica, but the work was original, unprecedented in accuracy and beautifully engraved.

In the 19th century new printing techniques allowed illustrators to work in a variety of media. Color printing was refined and became practical, helping usher in color atlases of pathology and colorful anatomy books for the public.

Medical Illustration in America

At the end of the 19th century a charming, dapper young artist was persuaded to leave his native Germany and pursue medical illustration at Johns Hopkins. Max Brödel would have an incomparable impact on medical illustration. Almost singlehandedly he would create and define the profession of medical illustration. While his magnificent illustration work in pen and ink, and carbon dust, a technique he devised, are an immense legacy, Brödel's most significant legacy is the first school of medical illustration. In 1911 he became the director of the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine. As the new department's sole instructor he proved himself to be an outstanding natural teacher. Other medical illustration programs sprang up across the United States and Canada. Graduates of Brödel's tutelage and the other schools would transform medical illustration into a profession, leading to the formation of the Association of Medical Illustrators in 1945.

by Alan E. Branigan
Condensed from The History of the Association of Medical Illustrators 1945-1995
edited by Robert Demarest © AMI 1995

The application process consists of these submitting items, the exam application below, proof of education (copy of transcript or diploma), and the appropriate fee.

Please answer all questions completely. The information contained herein will be considered confidential and is, together with all references, the property of the Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators. It is to the applicant's advantage to answer each question completely, accurately, and honestly. All persons shall receive fair, equal and impartial treatment by the Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators. All applicants shall be treated without regard to membership status, race, creed, color, national origin, sex, age, handicap, marital status or other criteria prohibited by law.

Important Notice: This application may be used to apply to take the certification exam at the AMI annual meeting. If you wish to take the exam at an alternate location, you must obtain permission and make arrangements before you submit an application. See the Certification Examination Information Bulletin for details.

Access online application

IMPORTANT NOTICE:


An applicant for certification is considered eligible if either of the two following situations is true:
1. You have a degree from a college/university program in medical illustration that includes a course in gross anatomy with hands on dissection, proven by transcript.
or
2. You have a minimum of five years full-time experience as a medical illustrator substantiated by letters of reference from employers, and proof of a college-level course in gross anatomy with hands on dissection or its equivalent.

Exam Fee $150.00
CMI renewal by exam (AMI Member) $300.00
CMI renewal by exam (non-AMI Member) $400.00


Offsite exam is subject to an additional $60.00 shipping charge.

Offsite exams for groups of three or more are eligible for a group shipping fee of $150. 

Payment can be made online via credit card (during application process) or by check. Please make checks payable to the Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators.

Send payment to:
Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators
c/o AMI - Jennifer Duckworth
PO Box 2272
Lexington, KY 40588-2272

Thank you. Your certification examination application form has been submitted. You will receive an email copy for your records.

Requirements for certification renewal:

1. This application and a $150.00 renewal fee must be received by the Board of Certification by the last day of your certification term. Please send payment in the form of a check. All funds must be in US dollars and drawn on a US bank.

2. AMI HQ will verify the 35 CE credit hours earned during the past five years.

Click here to access your account to complete the renewal form, add CE credits to your account, or request CE approval for an activity.

Upon receipt and processing of your application materials, you will receive a new certification certificate. Your renewal will be for another five year period.

If you would like to pay by check, please send to:
The Board of Certification of Medical Illustrators
PO Box 2272
Lexington, KY 40588-2272

To be completed by individuals/groups seeking CEU approval for workshops, courses, or programs not previously approved, or by individuals/groups giving workshops, courses, or programs. This submitted form will be sent to the CE committee chair and 3 CE committee members for review.

Please Note: This form should be submitted prior to participating in the continuing education activity. If this form is submitted later than 30 days after the activity is completed, CE credit will not be awarded.

NOTE: Applicant must answer all questions in detail. Please do not provide brochure or website. Activity will not be reviewed or approved if submitted with incorrect information.

Submit Continuing Education Activity Information Online

Download Continuing Education Activity Information Form (pdf)
This form MUST be submitted within 30 days after you have completed your activity, or no credit will be entered for the course. Shortly after submission of this form you will receive a confirmation email for your records.

Note that you must also submit a CE Activity Information Form (preferably in advance) to apply for continuing education credit for any activity that is not pre-approved by the AMI.

Submit Continuing Education Activity Verification Online

Download Continuing Education Activity Verification Form (pdf)